"I can get incredibly erotic about blotting paper"

mozmal

Beastly Little Parasite
I've just been throwing stuff out and found these in the loft. Also up there were my original Smiths 12" singles, some of them signed by Morrissey. Enjoy.

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An interview from Smash Hits, not sure of the date.

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Another interview.

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A Smiths ticket - £5 to see The Smiths:eek:

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A postcard that Morrissey signed for me after a Smiths gig in Manchester.
 

TheReader

Wasted 8 of 9 lives...
Thanks for posting those.

I love how the second interview contradicts the first on several points!
 

dailyalice

Frink Squad Member
I think that Smash Hits interview was one of the first things I read about him, and it was before I'd ever heard the Smiths! He seemed so interesting I ended up buying TQID.

And that was the interview where I learned we shared a fascination with stationary stores.
 
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Je Suis Julie

allyouneedismorrissey.com
Thank you for these wonderful scans! You have such a great collection. A signed postcard is....like the Holy Grail. *swoon*

He's so right about libraries, they don't make them like they used to.
Most bookstores are too sterile these days.

This is library heaven:
http://curiousexpeditions.org/?p=78
 

Aly

Member
Those are fantastic, mozmal - thanks for posting! I can see now where so many of the quotes from Morrissey: In his own words come from. :)

I giggle though at how he described himself his Lonely Hearts ad. "Mad, ugly, spotty and totally odorous" - what a little liar! :p
 

Anaesthesine

Angel of Distemper
Thanks for the memories, mozmal.

I love Morrissey's sideways approach to the word "spasmodically." The man is a poet.

He's so right about libraries, they don't make them like they used to.
Most bookstores are too sterile these days.

This is library heaven:
http://curiousexpeditions.org/?p=78

Wonderful link. :)

Growing up, I instinctively thought of libraries as holy places, more like church than church: the dark, polished wood, the old, rippling glass, the deep silence and (most gloriously) all those words, all that knowledge at your fingertips, sandwiched between gently aging bindings. The aesthetics of it were heavenly to me then, and now.

I only knew some measure of peace in this world when I finally put together a proper library of my own.

It's astounding to be living in the precise moment in history when the printed page as technological standard has finally been surpassed. I wonder why innovation so often leads to less beautiful things.
 

Uncleskinny

It's all good
Subscriber
See, the thing is, I understand completely what he means here. I used to go to a newsagents just to buy pristine mini-tablet-notebooks. They were beautiful. It almost felt a sin to write anything on them. I loved the way they were put together. Is that sad? Probably.

P.
 

TheReader

Wasted 8 of 9 lives...
See, the thing is, I understand completely what he means here. I used to go to a newsagents just to buy pristine mini-tablet-notebooks. They were beautiful. It almost felt a sin to write anything on them. I loved the way they were put together. Is that sad? Probably.

P.

It's not sad! I have loads of them - and I keep them in my bags and drawers 'just incase' but I can never bring myself to write in them.

Actually, I might start to because now I've written that, it does actually seem a bit weird :blushing:
 
Thanks Mozmal. :)

I too love old librarires and bookshops. My hometown library literally was a pre-fab, sweltering in summer, freezing in winter, but I was always there.

i worked in a bookshop once that was in an ancient timber-framed building with tiny staircases and a courtyard overlooked by leaded windows. Bibliophile heaven. :)
 

The Cat's Mother

Unmentionable
See, the thing is, I understand completely what he means here. I used to go to a newsagents just to buy pristine mini-tablet-notebooks. They were beautiful. It almost felt a sin to write anything on them. I loved the way they were put together. Is that sad? Probably.

P.

You're a stationary-fondler with a stash of pristine notebooks you don't want to spoil by writing in them? We have even more than Morrissey and Marmite in common, Peter. :lbf:

EDIT: We should form a stationary-fondlers' support group with Morrissey as president.
 
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CrookedLittleVein

Duck. Duck. Duck. Goose.
See, the thing is, I understand completely what he means here. I used to go to a newsagents just to buy pristine mini-tablet-notebooks. They were beautiful. It almost felt a sin to write anything on them. I loved the way they were put together. Is that sad? Probably.

P.

Not sad at all. There's something about buying a new notebook that makes you feel as if you're on the verge of realising some huge creative dream. :)
 

Uncleskinny

It's all good
Subscriber
You're a stationary-fondler with a stash of pristine notebooks you don't want to spoil by writing in them? We have even more than Morrissey and Marmite in common, Peter. :lbf:

EDIT: We should form a stationary-fondlers' support group with Morrissey as president.

I don't fondle them. I sniff them. Is that worse?

P.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
See, the thing is, I understand completely what he means here. I used to go to a newsagents just to buy pristine mini-tablet-notebooks. They were beautiful. It almost felt a sin to write anything on them. I loved the way they were put together. Is that sad? Probably.

P.

You might appreciate this being a chemist, Peter.

In America other than black and white composition books and a recent resurgence of little paper notebooks published by the Moleskein company, the best journal books that feel the oldest, circa 50's era, are laboratory notebooks. They have rounded corners and numbered pages and are stitched together, not glued. They're kind of expensive and usually only found on the bottom shelf of a university bookstore, but they remind me of a time when journaling was done in a proper book, not a spiral bound thing with cheap paper and the Jonas brothers on it. :p

Thanks for posting these interviews. My favorite part was the first song he wrote. :o
 

GingerSnap

New Member
You're a stationary-fondler with a stash of pristine notebooks you don't want to spoil by writing in them? We have even more than Morrissey and Marmite in common, Peter. :lbf:

EDIT: We should form a stationary-fondlers' support group with Morrissey as president.

I too am a stationary-fondler with a stash of pristine notebooks I don't want to spoil. Just last week I was tidying up my bedside cabinet and found I had 5 unused journals. I just keep buying them!
 

lazy_dyke

Member
They have all disappeared!
Rymans still exist in Altrincham & Manchester
Remember: stationery 'e' as in envelope
[I paid £5 to see The Smiths too]
 
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