Hiroshima - Blue Live (Apr. 27, 2012) post-show

Post your info and reviews related to this concert in the comments section below. Other links (photos, external reviews, etc.) related to this concert will also be compiled in this section as they are sent in.


Set List:

You Have Killed Me / There Is A Light That Never Goes Out / You're The One For Me, Fatty / When Last I Spoke To Carol / Alma Matters / How Soon Is Now? / Everyday Is Like Sunday / I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris / To Give (The Reason I Live) / Ouija Board, Ouija Board / First Of The Gang To Die / I Will See You In Far Off Places / Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me / Let Me Kiss You / Meat Is Murder / Scandinavia / Speedway // Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want

set list (scan from @vivahate72 / Twitter, link posted by an anonymous person and also Miss Garden) provided by Big Sister Midnight. Link posted by an anonymous person.



  • Photo posted by m2kj / Instagram. Link posted by an anonymous person.

    hiroshima.jpg
 
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Giselle

wasted 8 of her 9 lives.
I follow Morrissey's current drummer, Matt Walker (@mwBattery), on Twitter. Of late, he has been tweeting the occasional witty observation about the current Asian tour.

Earlier today, a few hours before the show, he tweeted about the poignancy of performing "I will see you in far off places" in Hiroshima.

 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
Is that really him on twitter?

"misty morning in tokyo...working on a cover of love by john lennon..."
 

Giselle

wasted 8 of her 9 lives.
Is that really him on twitter?

"misty morning in tokyo...working on a cover of love by john lennon..."

Yes, it is him, as far as I can tell. He has several different side projects that he does besides the Morrissey gig.
 
D

Deleted member 132

Guest
love that someone took a pair of scissors to the show.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
love that someone took a pair of scissors to the show.

This person came well-prepared! I've seen such HORRIBLE fights over the shirt; people biting and throwing punches. Somebody once nearly lost his teeth by trying to "share" the shirt by ripping it by his teeth while other people were pulling.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I follow Morrissey's current drummer, Matt Walker (@mwBattery), on Twitter. Of late, he has been tweeting the occasional witty observation about the current Asian tour.

Earlier today, a few hours before the show, he tweeted about the poignancy of performing "I will see you in far off places" in Hiroshima.



And what about singing the line 'Come, come nuclear bomb' in Hiroshima? I mean, I know it was a long time ago, but...
 
Y

yelahderaj

Guest
This person came well-prepared! I've seen such HORRIBLE fights over the shirt; people biting and throwing punches. Somebody once nearly lost his teeth by trying to "share" the shirt by ripping it by his teeth while other people were pulling.

Indeed! I nearly lost a finger trying to procure a scrap of a Union Jack he threw into the crowd in Vegas 1999. I got my scrap but wouldn't tussle for another one ever again.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
And what about singing the line 'Come, come nuclear bomb' in Hiroshima? I mean, I know it was a long time ago, but...

If your comment is intended as a criticism (which it seems to me to be), you've obviously missed the point of Matt's twitter post.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
oh yeah, getting out a scissor inmidst an excited crowd is much safer... :-/

This person came well-prepared! I've seen such HORRIBLE fights over the shirt; people biting and throwing punches. Somebody once nearly lost his teeth by trying to "share" the shirt by ripping it by his teeth while other people were pulling.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Before he sang everyday is like Sunday he said why do we do it? Whydo we do it? Because we must
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The best banter of the night was before playing "Everyday Is Like Sunday":
Why do we do it? Why do we do it? Because… Because, we must…
I love you!
Really? Are you sure?
After the song, the band paused and Moz asked if there were any observations to be made. Honestly, I think the group was over-thinking it onstage. The ones who got it weren't going to say anything (who would?!) and the ones who didn't just enjoyed the music and wanted the next song.
Maybe at other venues the audience has been made up a of more foreign (or foreign-familiar) people, but the Hiroshima audience was a less raucous crowd - afraid to ask questions and hanging on his every word between songs. Several times, when a person would ask a question - outside of their own language, mind you - he would chide them for poor pronunciation or what I figure were simple questions. I know he's always "particular" when chatting, but this was different - less playful and (even) more haughty. By the end of the show, during "Please, Please…" when the band was looking for the audience to sing back - and no one did - he called it quits. "Sayonara, that's all." He left miming punches to his face and sauntered off the stage. It's my fifth time to see Morrissey since the mid-90s, and first time to see him out of the States, and I'd say it was "only OK" compared to earlier tours. The band expected the crowd to be more into it and looked nervous after the silence became too much. Along with the usual (traditional?) assumption that western bands are usually a little sluggish in Japan, then you've got a decent show, but with nothing extraordinary. Coming to Hiroshima was a risk - small city without a big rock scene - and I'm glad he came, but it probably didn't go the way they had planned. The better songs: You're the One for Me, Fatty, When I Last Spoke to Carol, Alma Matters, First of the Gang To Die, and Let Me Kiss You. As with other Japanese shows, the crowd was wild for older Smiths tracks.
 

Giselle

wasted 8 of her 9 lives.
By the end of the show, during "Please, Please…" when the band was looking for the audience to sing back - and no one did - he called it quits. "Sayonara, that's all." He left miming punches to his face and sauntered off the stage. It's my fifth time to see Morrissey since the mid-90s, and first time to see him out of the States, and I'd say it was "only OK" compared to earlier tours. The band expected the crowd to be more into it and looked nervous after the silence became too much. Along with the usual (traditional?) assumption that western bands are usually a little sluggish in Japan, then you've got a decent show, but with nothing extraordinary. Coming to Hiroshima was a risk - small city without a big rock scene - and I'm glad he came, but it probably didn't go the way they had planned. The better songs: You're the One for Me, Fatty, When I Last Spoke to Carol, Alma Matters, First of the Gang To Die, and Let Me Kiss You. As with other Japanese shows, the crowd was wild for older Smiths tracks.

I must ask, did he leave during the song, or after it was finished? I assume the latter, but wanted to clarify.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I must ask, did he leave during the song, or after it was finished? I assume the latter, but wanted to clarify.

Sorry, I wasn't quite clear before.

He didn't storm off, but the song wasn't quite over either. It's more like he cut the song short. Onstage, everyone looked surprised and (to me) maybe a little embarrassed by it all. Instead of singing, he paced the stage miming punches and the band played on. After one pass across the stage, he walked off as the band played the closing measures. He was still in a good mood, I think, just tired of the quiet (albeit respectful) response. Personally, I actually enjoyed how quiet it was. After a loud concert full of screaming guitars and bellowing drums (and that gong!), it was great to end with a cool, relaxed coda.

I once saw him at the Fox in Atlanta - now *that* time, he left mid-song. The security wasn't doing a great job at crowd control, and several people jumped on the stage to touch, hug, or present Moz with gifts. He did a good job at dodging them, but about 30 minutes into the show two guys came at once, both smashing into him. And that was all. Show's over. The band finished the song voiceless with Alain apologizing afterwards. Cue the house music and grumble of disappointed fans.

Hiroshima was *much* better than that. It's just that you could tell they were ready to leave... At least from my perspective.

Hope that helps!
 

King Leer

Leering since '97
Thanks for the detailed observations.

It's a shame Hiroshima didn't get down as well as the shows in Kanto. It really does prove that Morrissey feeds off the audience. People listening quietly in Japan is not the same as a "dead" crowd in other places. "Shyness is nice," but not when you want Morrissey to give it his all.


The best banter of the night was before playing "Everyday Is Like Sunday":
Why do we do it? Why do we do it? Because… Because, we must…
I love you!
Really? Are you sure?
After the song, the band paused and Moz asked if there were any observations to be made. Honestly, I think the group was over-thinking it onstage. The ones who got it weren't going to say anything (who would?!) and the ones who didn't just enjoyed the music and wanted the next song.
Maybe at other venues the audience has been made up a of more foreign (or foreign-familiar) people, but the Hiroshima audience was a less raucous crowd - afraid to ask questions and hanging on his every word between songs. Several times, when a person would ask a question - outside of their own language, mind you - he would chide them for poor pronunciation or what I figure were simple questions. I know he's always "particular" when chatting, but this was different - less playful and (even) more haughty. By the end of the show, during "Please, Please…" when the band was looking for the audience to sing back - and no one did - he called it quits. "Sayonara, that's all." He left miming punches to his face and sauntered off the stage. It's my fifth time to see Morrissey since the mid-90s, and first time to see him out of the States, and I'd say it was "only OK" compared to earlier tours. The band expected the crowd to be more into it and looked nervous after the silence became too much. Along with the usual (traditional?) assumption that western bands are usually a little sluggish in Japan, then you've got a decent show, but with nothing extraordinary. Coming to Hiroshima was a risk - small city without a big rock scene - and I'm glad he came, but it probably didn't go the way they had planned. The better songs: You're the One for Me, Fatty, When I Last Spoke to Carol, Alma Matters, First of the Gang To Die, and Let Me Kiss You. As with other Japanese shows, the crowd was wild for older Smiths tracks.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
If your comment is intended as a criticism (which it seems to me to be), you've obviously missed the point of Matt's twitter post.

It wasn't meant as a criticism, I can see that that song would be poignant, I just thought that playing a song with the line 'Come, come nuclear bomb' in one of the only two cities in the world that have actually experienced the devastation of a nuclear bomb was noteworthy. Especially, as in the context of the song, it's quite a flippant reference: this town is so dull it would be better for it to be wiped out by a nuclear bomb. I've no objection to this jokey use of hyperbole, just wondered if it might become more fraught with meaning played in this city.

Just as I might joke - exaggerating for effect - that I'd rather die in a car crash than watch the X-Factor, but I might think twice about saying that if I knew that the person I was talking to had a family member who had died that way.
 

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