Here we criticise parents who don't vaccinate their children

chica

v2.0
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/london/7633399.stm


Fewer than half of all five-year-olds in London have had the MMR vaccine and booster jab.

Figures from the NHS show only 49% of children had received the first and second dose of the vaccine by their fifth birthday.


The MMR vaccine protects against measles, mumps and rubella.

Last month the government began a campaign to raise MMR vaccination rates in England, amid growing concerns about a measles epidemic.

The MMR jab is first given at about 13 months of age and the child is then given a pre-school booster.

The Primary Care Trusts (PCT) with the highest percentage of children who had received the MMR vaccination and booster by their fifth birthday are Kingston (76%), Hammersmith & Fulham (69%) and Sutton & Merton (68%).

The PCTs that fare the worst are Newham (42%), Islington (43%), and Brent Teaching (43%).

James Cleverly, chairman of the London Assembly Health and Public Services Committee, said: "The gap between coverage levels achieved in the capital and the national average is widening.

"Compared to the country's average of 74%, only 49% of children in the capital have had the MMR vaccine and booster by their fifth birthday.

"This is unacceptable."

Experts said the MMR vaccine should not be a cause for concern, but vaccination rates fell following controversy about its safety.

A spokesman for NHS London said in August a grant of £60,000 was announced for each London PCT to to raise the uptake of the MMR vaccine.

"Many people consider measles to be a relatively minor childhood illness, but it can have serious complications," he said.

"Measles represents the single biggest avoidable infectious disease risk in London today."
 

Cassius

New Member
I have a cousin who is autistic, and my aunt feels that he became so through vaccination.

I would more than likely vaccinate my children, but there's reasons people don't do it.
 

chica

v2.0
The age when MMR shot is given to children coincides with the age when autism is likely to be noticed. I don't know how to persuade people that the vaccine doesn't cause autism. Maybe give it to children just before they start school?
 

Cassius

New Member
The age when MMR shot is given to children coincides with the age when autism is likely to be noticed. I don't know how to persuade people that the vaccine doesn't cause autism. Maybe give it to children just before they start school?

I admit to knowing very little about the reasoning behind vaccinations causing autism. I'm assuming she did some research on it. How she came to that conclusion I don't know.
 

chica

v2.0
I admit to knowing very little about the reasoning behind vaccinations causing autism. I'm assuming she did some research on it. How she came to that conclusion I don't know.

Two reasons exist as far as I know, both have been proven to be myths; the other one is the fact that more and more autistic children started to be diagnosed every year after mass vaccinations were introduced. Which of course doesn't mean that there are more autistic children than 100 years ago, just that autism is more easily diagnosed.
 

Franzanna

In retirement
The autism argument is a load of bollocks. Autism is not a smegging infectious disease! The argument is a big causation flaw, just like saying that owning a car makes you more likely to get 'flu.

Two reasons exist as far as I know, both have been proven to be myths; the other one is the fact that more and more autistic children started to be diagnosed every year after mass vaccinations were introduced. Which of course doesn't mean that there are more autistic children than 100 years ago, just that autism is more easily diagnosed.

And this is exactly right! I don't think autism was even recognised as a condition a century ago. Recently there has been more research into autism, more cases are getting picked up on (mostly mild forms that would not have been noticed a few decades ago) and more conditions have been put under the autistic umbrella as well.
 

Mmmmmm

Dangling Member
I read a study recently which looked at the 'autism epidemic' in California. They determined that there was a direct correlation between the number of new cases of autism spectrum disorder and the number of people becoming qualified to diagnose and treat it.

In other words, the more we look the more we see signs of it in the general population and if my pay was tied to diagnosing and treating it, I'm sure I'd find it everywhere I looked.

Also, diagnostic criteria have changed at the exact time that the 'boom' has occurred. If we used the same criteria to look at 'problem children' 30 years ago, we'd find the incidence much higher then. The suggestion that every doctor in the world is in collusion to keep the dangers of vaccination a secret is ridiculous. Plus non-vaccinated children are still being diagnosed with autism at the same rate as those who were. Unfortunately, they are dying much more often now.

Until someone whose child dies of a preventable disease sues Jenny McCarthy and the other anti-vaccination lobby people, we'll be stuck with nonsense prevailing over good sense.

And even if it was proven that there was a 1 in 100 chance that the vaccine would for certain give my child autism versus a 1 in 1000 chance that my child would die of measles, mumps or rubella, I would still protect my child from death.

What are people thinking?
 

Franzanna

In retirement
I am autistic,the four years and degree from the Art Institute of Boston says I am.:p

WTF? :p
I did actually have the MMR vaccine and I have been diagnosed with an autistic umbrella condition (Asperger's), but I don't think having any vaccine made me any more likely to have it. As I said in my earlier post, it's all a big causation flaw.
 

oye terence

ampersand after ampersand
WTF? :p
I did actually have the MMR vaccine and I have been diagnosed with an autistic umbrella condition (Asperger's), but I don't think having any vaccine made me any more likely to have it. As I said in my earlier post, it's all a big causation flaw.

it was a terrible joke.:p
artistic - autistic
 

The Seeker of Good Songs

Well-Known Member
Just a thought here...
could part of the vaccination problem be that a larger portion of the population are from undeveloped countries and aren't educated on such things, or mistrust the government and medical authority?

another thought...
being an American, I would have thought with the "socialized" (don't know a better term for it) medicine that Britain has, that all children would be getting their "jabs" like recruits going into the military...line them up, stick them, and move the que along.
 

Corrissey

lovable loser
There's a greater risk of getting M/M/R without the shot than there is of getting autism from the shot. They make vaccines for good reason.
 
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