"Hello, my name's Julian and this is my friend Sandy...."

Discussion in 'Other Music archive (read-only)' started by The Cat's Mother, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. nightandday

    nightandday New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    2,057
    Location:
    behind a dis-used railway line
    That's true: http://www.passionsjustlikemine.com/disc/moz-d05id.htm

    and there is also an event from Morrissey's life that he might have been humorously referring to: in 1977, he applied for an au pair job. According to "Severed Alliance":

    "...Morrissey was eagerly anticipating a new life as an Au Pair Boy. Striking a blow for male equality, he has actually applied for an au pair job and was ready to give his prospective employers a right royal mouthful if he was turned down at the interview on the grounds of gender. "It women get equality, so can men", he told friends. The fantasy lasted several weeks more before ending with a written rejection." (p. 88) :D
     
  2. nightandday

    nightandday New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    2,057
    Location:
    behind a dis-used railway line
    'Punk' is a far older word, in Shakespeare's time it meant a prostitute (source: the glossary in the Oxford Complete Works of Shakespeare).

    Other meanings of the word 'punk' I've come across include a hoodlum, a young criminal, a male prostitute, and I've also read that it's used in American male prisons as a term for the prisoner who is abused by another one ('prag').

    It was first used to describe a genre of music in American fanzines.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punk_rock#Origin_of_the_term_punk

    Preceding the mid-1970s, punk, a centuries-old word of obscure etymology, was commonly used to describe "a young male hustler, a gangster, a hoodlum, or a ruffian".[26] As Legs McNeil explains, "On TV, if you watched cop shows, Kojak, Baretta, when the cops finally catch the mass murderer, they'd say, 'you dirty Punk.' It was what your teachers would call you. It meant that you were the lowest."[27] The term punk rock was apparently coined by rock critic Dave Marsh in a 1970 issue of Creem, where he used it to describe the sound and attitude of ? and the Mysterians.[28] In June 1972, the fanzine Flash included a "Punk Top Ten" of 1960s albums.[29] That year, Lenny Kaye used the term in the liner notes of the anthology album Nuggets to refer to 1960s garage rock bands such as The Standells, The Sonics, and The Seeds.[30] Bomp! maintained this usage through the early 1970s, also applying it to some of the darker, more primitive practitioners of 1960s psychedelic rock.[31]

    By 1975, punk was being used to describe acts as diverse as Patti Smith, the Bay City Rollers, and Bruce Springsteen.[31] As the scene at New York's CBGB club (popularly referred to as "CBGBs") attracted notice, a name was sought for the developing sound. Club owner Hilly Kristal called the movement "street rock"; John Holmstrom credits Aquarian magazine with using punk "to describe what was going on at CBGBs".[32] Holmstrom, McNeil, and Ged Dunn's magazine Punk, which debuted at the end of 1975, was crucial in codifying the term.[33] "It was pretty obvious that the word was getting very popular," Holmstrom later remarked. "We figured we'd take the name before anyone else claimed it. We wanted to get rid of the bullshit, strip it down to rock 'n' roll. We wanted the fun and liveliness back."[31]


    I remember an interview with John Lydon where he said he didn't like the term 'punk', especially when he learned of some of the original meanings. :)

    This is an interesting read:

    http://www.answers.com/topic/punk

    This is particularly funny:

    Library > Words > American Word Origins punk

    Origin: 1618

    Something like punk has been smoldering in American English for hundreds of years, undergoing drastic changes of meaning from century to century. It began as a bizarre kind of overcooked corn, explained in a 1618 account of certain Indians in Virginia: "Some of them, more thriftye then cleanly, doe burne the coare of the eare to powder, which they call pungnough, mingling that in their meale, but yt never tasted well in bread or broath." Around that time, also, punk was a word for "ashes" in the Delaware Indian language.

    A couple of centuries later, punk had become a word for the slow-burning sticks used in kindling fireworks. By 1889 it was a slang term for a cigarette, and by the end of the century punk had a sense "worthless" as in a story by George Ade: "And this crowd up there was purty-y-y punk."

    Today's first meaning of punk, a small-time hoodlum, developed in the period between the World Wars. And in the late 1970s punk came to designate bizarre clothing and body decorations associated with loud and aggressive rock music. To the general public, it still has an unpleasant taste.


    LMAO :D :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2007
  3. Dougal

    Dougal Junior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    182
    Thank you 'The Cat's Mother', those recordings are the dog's b*ll*cks. Hilarious. Am reading KW's diaries at the moment- he is hard going at times so good to be reminded of his sublime contributions to comedy.
     
  4. Born_That_Way

    Born_That_Way New Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Messages:
    26
    I am rather late for this download...

    Will somebody please re-post this.

    I have cassette tapes from the "Bona World of Julian and Sandy" shows but would very much like them in digital format.

    Regards.
     
  5. Born_That_Way

    Born_That_Way New Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Messages:
    26
Loading...

Share This Page