Greatest Lyricists Booklet - Morrissey, The Guardian 2008

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you must not tamper with arrangements
A series of booklet give-aways to readers of The Guardian and The Observer, featured the work of eight great lyricists of our time, along with some commentary. In total, 8 were produced from June 2008. Besides Morrissey, subjects included Bob Dylan and Chuck D.

The publishing occasion occupied a Morrissey-Solo thread at the time - https://www.morrissey-solo.com/thre...in-greatest-lyricists-booklet-giveaway.88005/

I don't think it's been uploaded though? Here is the cover, for starters

2008 Guardian Great Lyricists booklet Moz 1.jpg
 
A series of booklet give-aways to readers of The Guardian and The Observer, featured the work of eight great lyricists of our time, along with some commentary. In total, 8 were produced from June 2008. Besides Morrissey, subjects included Bob Dylan and Chuck D.

The publishing occasion occupied a Morrissey-Solo thread at the time - https://www.morrissey-solo.com/thre...in-greatest-lyricists-booklet-giveaway.88005/

I don't think it's been uploaded though? Here is the cover, for starters
No doubt The Guardian will be updating this for 2024 to include Bonfire and Notre Dame.
:lbf:
 
I got this at home. A Moz-solo moderator of the time sent me a copy, free of charge. Lovely guy!

Such different times in many respects.
 
Never seen this! Thanks so much for sharing.

Also, Tim Lott's novel White City Blue (out of print, somehow?) from 2000 is absolutely amazing.
 
Remember buying this at the time. Nice little book, for what was only a couple quid for the newspaper at the time. It's still on my shelf with my Morrissey/Smiths books.
 
Lyrics selected on following pages. Note last line of TQED.

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2008 Guardian Great Lyricists booklet Moz 7 001.jpg
 

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What’s the story behind that final line of TQID?
 
What’s the story behind that final line of TQID?
As you can see, it was the last line as printed on page 13, rather than at the end of the song; a line mostly omitted otherwise, and usually not sung.

(All their lies about make-up and long hair, are still there)

Uncle Skinny senses the line's importance:
I think of more importance to the song's message is the other 'hidden' lyric of "All those lies about make-up and long hair - they're still there", which is the true meaning of the song - the ditching of gay effeminacy, but wrapped up in a secondary, more prominent narrative.
- https://www.morrissey-solo.com/threads/i-dont-bless-them-qid-intro-meaning.147971/#post-1987381383

And a detail I spotted a few weeks ago, that I then thought was actually in the booklet, resulting in me spending quite a while trying to retrace it, because it's mentioned nowhere but in this note, online anyway:

Assuming they were supplied by the proper music publishers with Morrissey's approval, the printed version in the booklet confirms the suggestion in Simon Goddard's book that the line disguised in echo and not printed on the original album lyrics is indeed "(All their lies about make-up and long hair, are still there)".

So now we know for definite!


I cannot visualise what words 'disguised in echo' look like, if anything. Does anyone have an image?

That's as far as I got, but Uncle Skinny's thoughts in particular add a whole other dimension to the song's interpretation.
 
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That's all the lyrics, with a remaining select review I'll add shortly.

Tim Lott said the best thing about Morrissey is that he legitimises complaint. That's a big deal really. Most complaints lead to trouble and pain :tiphat:
 
Thanks for these. I found the interview interesting especially. I've been wondering why I didn't find any reference to his great hero Germaine Greer in his autobiography, but perhaps he thought he'd said enough about her already. I'm reading a biography of Greer at present, trying to understand what he sees in her.
 
I thought I'd be able to find that interview by Nicholas de Jongh somewhere else online but The Guardian has it archived out of sight, and my search elsewhere yielded nothing. I agree that it's a very engaging account of their chat!

I feel he may have come to appreciate Greer more in the past decade or so. Enjoy the book :)
 
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