Film "Shoplifers of the World" U.S. release in 2021, U.S. Deal With RLJE Films - Variety

Finally this film will be released in 2021.

AMC Networks-owned RLJE Films has swooped for U.S. rights to “Shoplifters of the World.”

Inspired by true events, “Shoplifters of the World” is set over the course of one night in the life of four friends who are reeling from the sudden dissolution of British band The Smiths. The same evening, a local radio station is also hijacked by an armed, impassioned Smiths fan, resulting in a madcap evening that sends up the spirit of the 1980s.

Starring Joe Manganiello (“Magic Mike”) as the radio DJ and Ellar Coltrane (“Boyhood”) as the hijacker, the film also stars Helena Howard (“Madeline’s Madeline”) and Elena Kampouris (“Before I Fall”). “Shoplifters of the World” is written and directed by Stephen Kijak (“We Are X”) and also features 20 tracks from The Smiths.

The U.K.’s WestEnd Films, which is handling international rights, has also sold the film into Japan (Parco), China (Time-in-Portrait Entertainment), the Middle East (Front Row), Portugal (Nos Lusomundo Audiovisuais), Turkey (Fabula) and Taiwan (B-Side Film). WestEnd is overseeing sales for the title at this week’s Toronto International Film Festival.

The U.S. distribution deal was negotiated by Mark Ward and Jess De Leo at RLJE Films and the producers. RLJE Films, which recently distributed the Shia LaBeouf-starring “The Tax Collector,” is planning to release “Shoplifters” early next year.

CAA Media Finance helped to arrange financing on the film.

“With ‘Shoplifters of the World,’ Stephen Kijak brilliantly transports us right back to the 1980s with the amazing look of the film and the unbelievable soundtrack,” said Ward, chief acquisitions officer for RLJE Films. “We are incredibly excited to bring this story and these great performances to U.S. audiences in 2021.”

“Shoplifters of the World” is produced by Untitled Entertainment’s Laura Rister (“The Tale”), 3:59’s Joe and Nick Manganiello (“La Bare”) and Piccadilly Pictures’ Christopher Figg. Also producing are Phil Hoelting, Adam Schoon and Lorianne Hall. Robert Whitehouse, from Piccadilly Pictures, is executive producing.

WestEnd Films’ TIFF slate also includes Pierce Brosnan-starrer “The Last Rifleman,” Frieda Pinto and Constance Wu’s “Mr. Malcolm’s List” and the Ewan McGregor-led “The Cow.”


UPDATE Sep. 15:

Link posted by Nerak:



Related items:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Comments

A

Anonymous

Guest
The legend of the armed Smiths fan hijacking the radio station isn't actually true, is it? I've always loved the story as a display of raging Smiths obsession, but isn't the truth that it never actually happened?
 
B

Bilbo Baggins

Guest
It’s astounding to watch the slump mentality of people who jumped the ship of musical quality and reality, in order to follow Morrissey, all the way down this shit-hole.

It used to be about separating the art from the artist. Now, for that lot, it’s got nothing to do with music.

Morrissey hasn’t released a decent tune in 25 years. His fans are like angry, dying, fruitcakes at a family Christmas dinner. Too many nuts and not enough substance.
 
R

Roger This

Guest
What
Morrissey mentions the incident:

"Once, in 1987, a young man in Denver held the local radio station at gunpoint, demanding that they play only Smiths songs. For four hours they complied and the Colorado airwaves were filled with the then-unfamiliar sound of Morrissey, until the police persuaded the gunman to back down. When Morrissey heard what had happened he felt, of course, extreme pleasure.
"But how did you know about it?" he demands.
"I've never come across anybody who knew about it." The fact that the siege has never been properly reported anywhere outrages Morrissey.
"If it was any other artist, it would have been world news. But because it was poor old tatty Smiths it was of no consequence whatsoever."


The updated Westword article that features James Kiss (who is quite real).


Regards,
FWD.
More narcissistic bullshit from the once was. Going on two decades since he’s out out anything listening two, yet here these rubes are - laying down their lives and reputations for the washed-up, bitter old codger.

It’s not Morrissey that needs to be dealt with. With his diet, he’ll be dead in a couple of years.

It’s the ignorant, unhinged fan-base (as it currently exists) that’s a real concern. Will they swallow the Kool-aid at his grave or will they carry on like North Koreans, as if Dear Leader is still very much in charge?

They’re already well past the point where death is an end. It’s a sickness. I feel for the other members of The Smiths. ....an incredible band, usurped by Moonies, Branch Davidians and Jehovah’ Witnesses.

Wee daft cunts, really. No?
 

Amy

from the Ice Age to the dole age
I can't understand the mentality of the Moz camp sometimes. He supports this niche little film about fandom and is happy to let them use the music, etc - basically a little PR opportunity. Yet he drove the very idea of 'England is Mine' into the ground as soon as it was suggested, something that could have been really enjoyable for Smiths fans? Give me a film about the actual break-up, I'd pay to see that :lbf:
 

Amy

from the Ice Age to the dole age
“England is Mine part 2”? ;)
A Smiths biopic would be brilliant but it would never happen, this side of the 'great estrangement'.
One day...
 
I can't understand the mentality of the Moz camp sometimes. He supports this niche little film about fandom and is happy to let them use the music, etc - basically a little PR opportunity. Yet he drove the very idea of 'England is Mine' into the ground as soon as it was suggested, something that could have been really enjoyable for Smiths fans? Give me a film about the actual break-up, I'd pay to see that :lbf:
I don’t think it's that surprising that he seems to favour this project over something like England Is Mine. This the type of story about devotion and fanatism paired with a bit of anarchy and rebellion that appeals to him. It's a bit odd, but it also has a whiff of danger about it. He loves this type of stuff.

What he doesn't like is people bringing up his past, snooping around, including aspects he doesn't feel comfortable with. Not being in control of his own narrative seems to be one of his biggest fears.
 

Amy

from the Ice Age to the dole age
I don’t think it's that surprising that he seems to favour this project over something like England Is Mine. This the type of story about devotion and fanatism paired with a bit of anarchy and rebellion that appeals to him. It's a bit odd, but it also has a whiff of danger about it. He loves this type of stuff.

What he doesn't like is people bringing up his past, snooping around, including aspects he doesn't feel comfortable with. Not being in control of his own narrative seems to be one of his biggest fears.
I agree, but he probably could have had more control if he'd been on board with England is Mine - it was happening anyway. All he did was 'divorce' himself from it and then complain about it. It's grim that any future Moz biopic (and surely there will be one?) will now have to veer into his politics and the racism debate and this whole dismal 'final leg' of his career. Unless they do a 'Rocket Man' and just cut off after the Quarry comeback.
 

Whizz Kid

Active Member
I agree, but he probably could have had more control if he'd been on board with England is Mine - it was happening anyway. All he did was 'divorce' himself from it and then complain about it. It's grim that any future Moz biopic (and surely there will be one?) will now have to veer into his politics and the racism debate and this whole dismal 'final leg' of his career. Unless they do a 'Rocket Man' and just cut off after the Quarry comeback.
Johnny's mentioned interest in his book Set the Boy Free being made into a movie. Although last year he said he was avoiding taking any meetings. If that gets made, Morrissey can exit with the Smiths.
 

Amy

from the Ice Age to the dole age
Johnny's mentioned interest in his book Set the Boy Free being made into a movie. Although last year he said he was avoiding taking any meetings. If that gets made, Morrissey can exit with the Smiths.
I'm open to the idea, but I can't imagine it. Johnny was so careful to sidestep conflict that he barely mentions Morrissey and skips over 'big issues' like the split and the court case in a few paragraphs. Everything was 'nice', 'great', me-and-my-mates, me-and-my-guitar...it was an exercise in trying to please everybody and that's honourable but it doesn't make for an interesting film. The latter half of the book is basically, "then I joined this band, then I joined that band, all of it was super...."Also - though I love Johnny to death, I can't see what interest there would be in the early life of an indie guitarist. Morrissey is/was a pop culture icon and EIM was still low-budget.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Have you read the book? It's really good and his early life is very adventurous.
No, it really isn't. He hypes up the fact that he joined a band of spotty teenagers who were a bit older than him, as if he'd gone on the road with a Hell's Angels crew. He got lifted for nicking something. He played in bands with his mates. He smoked some hash. He met Morrissey after a gig one night and they said hello. Er... that's about it.
 

Similar threads

Trending Threads

Top Bottom