Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on this!

GirlAfraid23

New Member
I have set out some survey questions to begin with...I would be very grateful if you could all answer these either in here or PM me if you'd rather...here are the questions:

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?

2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?

4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?

6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent

9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?
 
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Raphael Lambach

Well-Known Member
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?
Yeah.. when I've found some artists and band my way of seeing the thing and the world has changed. It doesn't create another human being inside me, it only shows diffferent way of seeing the things.


2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?
The Fist time I heard about Morrissey was in 2001 in an interview with Renato Russo (recorded in 1993). But only in 2003 I was search for him and his work. I was looking for answers about myself.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?
Yes, after I've known Morrissey I decided never marry or have children.

4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?
I'll never stop eating meat.

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?
I'm not sure if it creates a imaginary world but this forum helps in the transmission of Morrissey's works and thoughts. Maybe some members created an universe inside theirselves, but that's because Morrissey's lyrics and not this forum.

. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

In my opinion, Morrissey is an victim of racism.

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?
Yes. It happens because Morrissey works as a theme of discussing. When I'm in here I feel I''m part of this.

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent
I think when you share something about someone, for example, it's a way of featuring everything you know about the subject.

9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?
It's incredible how Morrissey has many vegan fans, his influence over fans is amazing. I don't know if you remember but weeks ago there was a bad talk about vegetarianism.
 
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Call me morbid

New Member
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?

All great music is the music of the outsider. As a skinny pallid teenager stuck in suburbia his music was a flashing neon sign through the darkness.

2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?

A friend handed me a cassette of Viva Hate on a windswept muddy school playing field in 1990 and was immediately thunderstuck by the perculiar lyrics.
I then binned all my Deacon Blue albums.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?

Outsiders like the music of outsiders. He is the ultimate rebel. Morrissey made it acceptable to be bookish and to defy grey little England and its conservative establishment and conventions. Political, social, sexual, ethical...


4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?

Its wasn't entirely due No. But it affirmed that it was completely unneccessary and barbaric and you were not alone in thinking this. I was converted after staying up late and watching a Channel Four documentary about the meat industry.

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?

No. Its like pissing in the wind.

6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

Morrissey was not the first to use the pop record as a tool for social commentary. Re Ray Davies, The Kinks. Paul Weller, The Jam...
Just because he has used art to address 'issues' doesn't mean he embodies or agrees with them.
Doestovsky wrote Crime and PUnishment but I bet he wouldnt have an Asbo for perpetually thieving from Primark.
 

The Ghost of Troubled Joe

Used to be a sweet boy
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?
Throughout our lives many things have an influence on the way we develop or consider things including books, teachers, trauma. Therefore I'm sure music, in particular lyrics, also play a part.

2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?
1983 listening to the legendary John Peel. Alot of the music at that time was bland and meaningless, I felt that I had discovered something that I could relate to.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?
Very difficult for me to answer as I was 13/14 in 1983. Being a teenager I was going through the process of discovering or developing a new social identity but no doubt his words had an influence in the direction.

4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?
I am a meat eater so the quote bears no relevance. Majority of Morrissey's lyrics provoke considerable thought but whether any have changed me I am not sure. Although as I have said in Q3 could have played a part in making me what I am.

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?
For some forums maybe. If this question is directed more at this forum then I don't think it has. The community of Morrisseys deciples is real not imaginary and has existed outside this forum albeit fragmented. The forum gives the opportunity for people to discuss and debate their passion with likeminded people they would probably never meet especially when friends and family do not share this passion.

6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

I believe Morrissey is not a racist. But his work does cover ground that sometimes attracts controversy. In my opinion these are observations of things happening within society and not necessatily always his personal opinions.
It hasn't changed my view of my heritage or identity, I share this world until my time is done with everyone else. I am no more important and have no more right to any part of this planet than any other individual

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?
I observe a sense of communality. Even though I have a sense of belonging I tend to find I experience it more as an observer, if that makes sense.

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent
Find this hard to answer, sorry. The most common characteristic majority of Morrissey fans have is seen at live shows with the desire to be touched by him.

9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?
No. Morrissey fans come from every walk of life and are of any age. Some are extrovert and some are introvert. I think the perception that most Morrissey fans follow a stereotype is one generated by ignorance.
 
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GirlAfraid23

New Member
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

EDIT: I have included three further questions, those who have already answered could you please answer the new three too :) thank you
 

dom

Thats How People Throw Up
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

[EDIT: With three extra questions]

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?

I think music is UN-BELIEVABLY poweful, and often underestimated in terms of what it can DO to an individual and how it can affectively CHANGE them in some ways. I believe that, in simple terms, violent music can encourage violent behaviour and calm music encourages calm peaceful natures. That however is more in the short term. The answer to you question lies more in the looking at the long term affects. For me, listening to an artist such as Maralyn Manson and Eminem when i was a young impresionable teenager slowly created in me a rising anger, fueled by the angst in the lyrics and melodies and helped on by my adolescence. It made me feel like there was possibly no hope and there is sut quite a lot of darkness in the world and not much else. It came out in the paintings i drew, the things i said and the way i thought about things.

Short answer: ... Yes


2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?

Some time in the summer of 2004, a friend of mine played me The Queen is dead vinyl and it almost imediately spoke to me. He made me a compilation CD .. suddenly, at one point, it was all i was listening to. I then got "Morrissey, Suedehead, The Best of" and then it exploded. I embarked on slowly increasing my collection and arrived at a solid and total appretiation of Morrissey and The Smiths. He is the only artist will get GENUIELY excitedabout seeing.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?

I feel quite secure and care-free about my social identity to be honnes. So i don't think it particularly changed much bout that for me. The only thing it does do, in many ways, is alienate me from certain people .. but only in terms of "musical social identity" ... (if that's a real term) ... People who havent heard much Morrissey material just seem to be missing out on something, and comunicating with them about it only seems to bring out he stereotypical "Ohhh Morrissey, YEAH .. he's so depressing .. he's such a moaner / whinger / moper .. etc .. etc" ... All the usual stuff which they've obviously just re-gurged from the media or from friends re-gurging the media TO them


4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?

I eat meat. "Meat is murder" did not convince me of anything, nor do i agree with the lyrics ... Though it is possibly my fave Smiths album


5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?

I sincerly hope this forum and comunity is an imagined one, as so many people seem to be quite aggressive or needlessly absive on here, but I have met Morrissey fans in the flesh at gigs and they are lovely people ... so .. ??? ... On this basis i could would say that being part of an onlie forum does create an imaignairy comunity, as i reckon peopel are far more open to be abusive and mean compared to meeting in real life, as it is not face to face. Some may argue that this shows a TRUER side of a comunity as peoples replys are more honnest.

It IS a comunity, as we share one common fan-ship and love, and share that with each other, but it IS, i think an imaginairy one, due to the fact that we are all un-seen, and untouchable and hiding behind avitars and text


6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?


The media have bashed this out till its blue in the face. He is not racist, but the material does suggest and induce that idea a little. I would say that was probably not intentional in The Smiths era, but now, maybe Moz is intentionaly miss-leading, just to take the pee a little. His quote seems very genuine and heart-felt, and it sounds like the Morrissey we all know.

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?

SOME .. and some really GENUIELY. I feel so happy and in love with Morrissey with them. Others seem intent on just tearing apart everything you say. To these i just feel exhausted and tired with, and find it hard to share that love of Morrissey with them.

As a group, there is a sense of comunity by the way (as i said before) we all sharea common goal and focus .. a person . a discography .. but i often struggle to find anything more past that. However, so as not t be entirely pessamistic .. when a group of us have come back from a particular venue and are commenting on a thread for that venue .. there is definitely a sense of shared excitement and passion. It is one of the times where the 'comunity' on here come together and genuinly just gush.

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent

As mentioned before. The shared goal / focus / person ... Morrissey. After all, if wasn't for him and his musc, then this comunity would not excist. imagined or otherwise.

It seems more important to some fans to share common bond of beliefs and views, for example, vegetarianism. Threads have popped up about wether we should be eating meat as Morrissey doesn't. This to me seems insane, but to some, totally, or at least a bit, logical.

9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?
Some things. Like the obsession in trying to reach out and touch him at gigs. This seems an automaic, almost intuative response. When he drifts by on stage, peoples hands just fly out. Its automatic, and typical. A Moz gig woul not be complete without it.

A sense of passion and excitement about Morrissey. Obviously,that is what ANY fan of ANY artist / group has .. which is what makes them fans, but some things im convinced are uniqe to Morrissey fans. I have always said that there are NO fans like Morrissey fans. They are generally manic, passionate individuals (when it comes to a gig at least)

Trying to get on stage. Though not quite so common now, but that is really more to do with security and health and safety anal-ity!! ... Less restriction and there would be more Moz lynchig. This is another thing that is UNIQUE to Morrissey fans. Security guards are often warned specificaly at Moz gigs that people may try to get on the stage. Although you probably get some at other gigs trying to do so, it is NOT the NORM .. neither would it be expected so much so that guards would be warned about it previous to the gig, as is so often the case in Moz gigs.
 
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SparkleBoy

worships Johnny Thunders
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

Liberal Arts degree?
 

GirlAfraid23

New Member

dom

Thats How People Throw Up
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

The very best of luck GirlAfraid. I hope my answers help. i have a bit of a head ming today .. and i tend to waffle .. so i hope it's ok.

This seems an awesome cool project for you!! I hope the academic / research side of this does not take away any excitement you may have.

love x
 

GirlAfraid23

New Member
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

The very best of luck GirlAfraid. I hope my answers help. i have a bit of a head ming today .. and i tend to waffle .. so i hope it's ok.

This seems an awesome cool project for you!! I hope the academic / research side of this does not take away any excitement you may have.

love x
Thank you dom, any help is appreciated, your answers seem very interesting and helpful so thank you!
It is qualitative research which is layman's terms means simply, "descriptive research" so waffle is greatly appreciated!
:) Thank you x
 

Jessikers

Some Passable Creature
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?

I think we identify with music in the first place because it means something to us, but then as time goes on, the music starts to influence you more deeply. How? I'd say that knowing that someone out there feels the same way I do about so many things makes me feel like there's a place in this world, even for me.

2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?

I got into Morrissey in 1989 when I heard the album "Louder Than Bombs". It was the first music I had ever listened to and IMMEDIATELY loved. After that, I couldn't get enough.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?

No, I've always been an outsider and continue to be one.


4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?

Morrissey has made me more aware of the plight of animals and how humans exploit them. I do agree that if there is someone you admire so much that feels so strongly about something, one tends to try to sympathize and think about it a little more.

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?

I've not been a part of this forum for long enough, but I've been part of other forums where I have made friends and have continued being friends with them for years, and have met them in person. It helps to have something in common and I think it's amazing that forums like this bring people together from all over the world.

6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

I think that Morrissey and The Smiths cover a lot of political ground. For me, I've mostly been made more aware that we shouldn't simply put our heads down and shuffle along with the status quo. Questioning authority is the proper and healthy thing to do. As far as my national heritage, I don't think that "America you know where you can stick your hamburger" makes me all too proud to be an American, but I do feel that Morrissey admires many of our American legends like James Dean, and that makes me happy.

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?

Yes, I do! As soon as I find that someone is a lover of Morrissey, they automatically gain brownie points with me. Being a Morrissey fan doesn't make someone perfect, but it does give me a sense of the kind of person they are. (just the smallest sense)

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent

This person has empathy for the underdog, knows what it is like to suffer. All humans do, I suppose- but it's a special kind of underlying value system that the Morrissey fan seems to have.


9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?

No, I've met all different types of Morrissey fans. We're atypical; that's what makes it so amazing.
 
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?

As a basically shy person I was attracted to Morrissey's lyrics, because I think that he can express how I feel, but I listen to plenty of other types of music. But I'm not sure that listening to particular types of music has changed me as a person.

2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?

The first Smiths record I heard was 'What difference does it make' in 1984, which came out just as I'd finished a relationship. Some of the lines in that particular song were all to accurate in describing how I felt during those days.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?

To some extent, as it helps to bond with fellow Morrissey fans, and even those who like his music but aren't out and out fans.

4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?

I've dabbled with vegetarianism from time to time, entirely due to Morrissey, but never found the comittment to give up meat permanently. Sorry, Moz.

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?

It is an imaginary community, but it also becomes a real community when we meet some of the other members at gigs, and events such as the Star and Garter.

6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

I'm not comfortable with the lyrics to 'Bengali in Platforms', but I thought the NME's earlier attack on Morrissey (in 1992) was completely unjustified. They accused him of being racist because he waved the Union Jack at concerts, but it's the national flag of this country, he was just being patriotic. And the song 'Asian Rut' was even dragged into the debate, even though it's an anti-racist lyric about an attack on an asian boy.

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?

To some extent, as to admire Morrissey you have to have a certain amount of intelligence and good taste.

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent

When you share an interest in Morrissey, it helps to 'break the ice' and get to know someone better. Although I'm sure that there will be a lot of Morrissey fans who won't share my views on various issues.

9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?

We all tend to be obsessive, especially about quoting his lyrics at every opportunity. Some men try their best to look like him, but at the age of 46 I no longer have enough hair to grow a quiff. I'll just have to make do with wearing the T-Shirt.
 

Troy

Whistlejacket
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

Hello.

:) Music is absorbed within my very soul, when I was 13/14 years old and first heard Morrissey's voice, it were as though an Archangel were singing above the tinsel mire of 'plastic' bands around at the time. It haunts me to this day. Also hearing The Ring Cycle opera by Wagner, for the first time, brings tears to my eyes recalling it, such audio-visual beauty brings nothing but wealth and spiritual growth to our lives.

:)I first saw Morrissey across an empty . . in early 1983, hearing his music previously, I danced to hang the dj at school and gazed in awe and a little fear of the statuesque Morrissey.

:)Morrissey was the only identity for me, as an outcast there was no one, I didn't have the clothes or big hair, I was just another schoolgirl whom dare not open her mouth to speak for fear, Morrissey spoke for many at the time whom felt the same isolation and violence embedded within the landscape.

:)Morrissey's words were speaking my situation, How Soon Is Now is one of the greatest songs he has ever written. This song encompasses my whole life - but in an inspirational way - am priviledged to have grown up besides Morrissey and his work, he has always been there.

:)An online community is very much a real one! I feel as though I am in the market place with the rabble, both jeering and saluting the days news!!!

:)Morrissey does tread a seismic pathway on our behalf, we take him too much for granted. Cannot answer rest of question re:heritage.

:)Yes.

:)A psychic bond from Morrissey's massive spirit and the powerful love within it - why else would we love him so unconditionally?

There is no such, thing in life as normal.
 
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?
sure. every band, every song, every album that I like becomes a part of my mind and soul, especially when there's some great lyrics.

2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?
a friend of mine borrowed me the Quarry-album in 2004. I was stunned: never read such brillant lyrics before, never heard anyone singing like he does.
6 months later I possessed all official Smiths & Moz albums and friends called me a Hardcore-Fan

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?
Absolutely.
He made me decide to never have children, never marry.
I also began to show some interest in homosexuality, Oscar Wilde and Manchester.

4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?
Well, I haven't stopped eating meat. I tried but I failed.
Nevertheless (as mentioned above) lyrics about never marry and never have children really changed my life.

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?
I'm not sure if it's a community but it's a great place to get in contact with other Fans

6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

Nope. he's definitely no racist. No way.
Well, I never felt like a patriot (I'm Austrian) and I definitely never wanted to be a patriot but this has nothing to do with Moz/Smiths,
this decision was made long before I knew about Moz/Smiths.

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?
Absolutely. When I meet a person who knows and likes Moz/Smiths, I feel connected to him/her.

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent
If the person likes Moz/Smiths, then I'm sure that he/she must be an interesting person with a good taste in music, movies and books.

9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?
No, the typical Morrissey Fan does not exist. Go to a Moz concert and you will meet all kinds of people: young, old, introverted, extroverted, Indie people, Metalheads, Gothics, Rockaybillies etc. etc.
 

JD93

New Member
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?

Definitely, although the word 'particular' is very important. I don't think listening to the music of Cheryl Cole could have any effect on anybody's self-identity. It is easy to immerse yourself in the world of a pop star like Morrissey because he has a very clear identity. This is why many teenagers become engrossed in music, because it is an experiment in finding yourself - if that doesn't sound too new-age.

2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?

i had heard 'Irish Blood, English Heart' in 2004 and was impressed, but it
wasn't until late 2007 that I found the Smiths and was entranced. I think i was particularly drawn to Morrissey's humorous lyrics such as 'Frankly, Mr. Shankly" and also the very sepia, Britishness of the imagery he used.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?

Yes, completely. I think at first people like the music because there is some form of identification with the lyrics, and through this Morrissey becomes a beacon for the maladjusted; he helps people to come to terms with what they are. And he is living evidence that a person can exploit their own weaknesses and turn them into weapons, and succeed.

4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?

It's hard to judge how much Morrissey has changed me. However, although I don't eat meat I am not vegetarian. I just don't eat very much. But certainly his lyrics have changed me, as they have influenced my thinking on many topics such as isolation, friendship, gender, sexuality, vegetarianism, art and alienation.

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?

I don't think the communities created online are imaginary. I think they are very, very real and often quite intense because, being online, you have the privilege of being able to say things that you would never consider saying in real life. Often online relationships are more interesting and important than ones in real-life. Communities are created on forums because while all members have one over-riding interest, other things are discussed at great length, and people may actually get to know one another more intimately than they would have the opportunity to in a real life work or social situation - even if that means you don't necessarily know what the person looks like.

6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?


No, his lyrics have never been racist or even unstable. All the controversy surrounding Morrissey's attitudes to national identity has been completely invented by the media. In terms of my own sense of nationality Morrissey has been quite important in establishing certain ideas, mostly through the imagery of the Smiths and his own influences - kitchen-sink drama for example. I completely identify with his romanticism for certain places in London and images such as the one in his L.A house of Bobby Moore - that contain a nostalgia for a lost Britain. I think that Morrissey's romanticism for these things is a very beautiful and pure form of patriotism, and is an alternative to the establishment's patriotism - Union Jacks and Rule Britannia, and an extension of the working class patriotism - The St. George Cross, beer, complaining and football.

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?

No. I would never identify myself as a 'Morrissey fan' in that sense, although if I met somebody and they were into Morrissey then obviously I would make certain assumptions about what they were like and that would interest me.

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent

I think by consuming and immersing oneself in Morrissey's world, it makes it very easy to be influenced and interested in the same things. Common values would probably include a distaste for categorising and labelling, complete disregard for other people's views, especially that of people in power, and also an interest in being alone and retaining a certain enigma, not giving too much away about oneself to other people. Aesthetically, an interest in faded stars and the romanticism of the past is definitely something I would expect from someone who likes Morrissey.

9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?

I highly doubt it, although there is a stereotypical, almost ideal Morrissey fan, and those are the things I listed above - perhaps a Morrissey fan, when looking for a friend or partner, would seek out certain things. For men, I think that is someone who is not particularly masculine, who is quite naturally androgynous, a quiet creature who has much to say. For women, the ideal is probably something along the lines of those women contained in the Morrissey canon - the Girl Least Likely To, Black-Eyed Susan, a Linder Sterling type character as immortalised in Cemetry Gates...someone who is very, very attractive but also quite isolated and hopeless.
 
G

goinghome

Guest
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

Fantastic self-clarifying questions, and fantastic answers so far. I'll try soon. Will we be able to see the final report please?
 

CapriciousCorin

Junior Member
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

Good questions! But here they are aswered in the context of the forum, which could render different answers than if posted as a PM.
But I know you're aware of that!
Good luck!
 

mattisek

Member
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?

Yes. In fact many people who know me would argue I take popular music way too seriously. To me popular music has had an big impact in life. It's certainly not only entertainment to me. Generally speaking it has influenced my views on certatain things although I have to admit it was strong influence in my teenage days whereas now I feel obviousla much more settled.

2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?

Around 1986/1987. Someone played "Panic" to me and it really related to me. I was fed up with "chart" music and The Smiths were important to me to discover "alternative" music. At first Johnny Marr's arrangements were probably more important to me but I soon discovered Morrissey's message: Which I think is: It's good to be different.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?

It certainly played a part. It made me more open to discover new subjects I wasn't completely aware of. But what was probably more important it gave me amongst other people, books etc. some orientation for things I was already looking for without knowing till then what I was looking for.

4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?

Well I still do eat to some extent eat meat. So the best I can say is it made more aware of the problem with the meat industry. But to be honest it wasn't my main appeal to Morrissey work.

5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?

Well I'm a bit old fashioned and as my posts indicate I'm not posting all the time in here. But this and other forums certainly inspired me to a certain extent. Also I wouldn't rule out that it is a platform to make friends with peoplw who share the same interest. But my priority is the "real" worls.

6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

It certainly dealt with certain rascist issues. Nonetheless I certainly wouldn't call him a rascist. Some people are just too simple-minded and don't realise that lyrics may be open to interpretation. I also think that Morrissey work is quite political although not in sense of party politics. I wouldn't say it had a major influence on my views.

7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?

In general I would argue it feels like a bond between us. I obviously apreciate if people share my taste.

8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent

Thank God Morrissey fans are different too. The common interest obviosly makes it easier to get into touch with peple. However it's also interesting to meet people with a different aproach and also met a few annoying people at Morrissey concerts.

[B]9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?

Again, Morrissey's message to me is it's good to be different. And as we all know there are lots of different people attrac[/B]ted to Morrissey. That's the common thing and hopefully to tolerate this proposal.

Good luck with your dissertation!
 
Re: Everyone who wants to participate in my dissertation research please click on thi

1. Do you find listening to particular popular music has any effect on your identity and creation of self, if so how?

When I was younger it helped me see there were other ways of being and doing than my smalltown upbringing had revealed. But my musical tastes were too varied, and my unwillingness to join a herd too strong to choose a pop culture based identity.


2. When did you first get into Morrissey and why?

A friend gave me a copy of ROTT to listen to. I liked it and went to the library to find more. I remembered how much I had loved the Smiths.

3. Do you feel Morrissey has formed a different social identity for you, opposed to the one you had before you started listening?

No. Other people treat me differently, because I like Morrissey, but my beliefs, behaviour, dress remain the same.


4. “My decision to stop eating meat wasn't entirely due to Morrissey & The Smiths, though they was certainly a factor.” Do you agree with this quote? Has anything of the Smiths or Morrissey’s lyrics changed you in any way like this?

My gradual transition to vege predated Morrissey. I have thought harder about why I want to be vege now, as the last thing I'd want to do is be vege to please a stranger.


5. Do you believe by being part of an online forum, an imaginary community is created and if so how?

Being part of an online forum is communicating with people I would not otherwise have encountered. This has it's ups and downs like any other form of social interaction. A sense of community is formed by the repetition here of the structures, rules, rulebreakers, shared values, disagreements that would be found elsewhere. It is however not limited to those who can and do choose to communicate by this means, as people here do meet up in real life too.


6. “I believe the NME have deliberately tried to characterise me as a racist in a recent interview in order to boost their circulation. I abhor racism and cruelty of any kind and will not let this pass.” – Morrissey 2007.
With this quote in mind, would you consider Morrissey and The Smith’s work to cover racist or unstable political ground? If so, has this changed your view of your individual uniqueness and the way in which you perceive your national heritage and an identification with that?

When I was younger I was ignorant, less well-informed socially. By the time I listened to Morrissey's lyrics my opinions were well-established. Morrissey in interview is quoted as being interested in national identity and a sense of loss because of social change. Beyond that I don't find much reliable reporting to conclude what Morrissey's opinion is. I believe Nationalism causes problems and divisions, and it is possible to enjoy ones culture, food, tradition, without concluding they are in any way superior to anyone elses simply by reason of nationality. Basic Human Rights for all, regardless of background, is what I wish for.


7. Do you experience a general sense of communality with other Morrissey fans as a group, including ones you have never met or communicated with?

Not really, beyond some shared musical tastes.


8. If so, what do you think underlies this sense? To what extent do you think it depends on shared characteristics beyond a common liking for Morrissey, such as common values, views, personalities or aesthetics? For example: participating in the same activities etc. to some extent

I think some people like the comfort of a group, and the companionship of like-minded people. Those who enjoy the company of other Morrissey fans may also belong to other close-knit social groups, with differing values and aesthetics. (eg football team supporters).


9. Is there such a thing as a typical Morrissey fan to you? If so, how would you describe him/her?

No.
 

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