Dublin, Ireland (Dec. 1, venue to be announced Sep. 5) - true-to-you.net

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
Ticketmaster.ie now has the event finally listed, and confirms ticket prices ranging from 59.50 to 79.50 + TM fees.
http://www.ticketmaster.ie/morrisse...rtistid=770791&majorcatid=10001&minorcatid=60

It also confirms the presale time of 9am on Wednesday next, for those able to access
O2 Ireland Priority tickets: http://music.o2online.ie/Artist/Details/267
or
Three Ireland Priority tickets: http://music.three.ie/Artist/Details/267

It does not specify anywhere that the floor is standing, I would assume that it is, but it's just not confirmed anywhere that I know of, anyone spot this confirmed ?

Thanks a million fayf for your concise & precise info on this one.

Just some quick questions ~ I haven't been at the venue since seeing SPM at 'The Point' Christmas 2004 (a Great Night, a Shite Venue). I would guess it's changed a wee bit since then (although probably still shite, as with most of these oversized sheds).
But where would you suggest the best seats to be, with regard to proximity to and view of the stage? In terms of Block letters, Row/Seat numbers, etc?

I am maintaining the vain illusion that I will have much of a choice in such matters, come Friday at 9 (or Wednesday same ~ working on that).

And with the O2/3 pre-sale, have you ever had good quality seats from that, or has it always been duffers?

Any info gratefully appreciated. And cheers again for help to date.
 

fayf

Member
Thanks a million fayf for your concise & precise info on this one.

Just some quick questions ~ I haven't been at the venue since seeing SPM at 'The Point' Christmas 2004 (a Great Night, a Shite Venue). I would guess it's changed a wee bit since then (although probably still shite, as with most of these oversized sheds).
But where would you suggest the best seats to be, with regard to proximity to and view of the stage? In terms of Block letters, Row/Seat numbers, etc?

I am maintaining the vain illusion that I will have much of a choice in such matters, come Friday at 9 (or Wednesday same ~ working on that).

And with the O2/3 pre-sale, have you ever had good quality seats from that, or has it always been duffers?

Any info gratefully appreciated. And cheers again for help to date.

Assuming it is a standing gig, then rows 1 to 20 in sections A to G will not exist for this gig.
The best seats in the house are sections E, D & C, rows 21 to 32, however, most of the front rows of these sections are held for the O2 premium club http://thepremiumclub.ie/

My experience on the presales has been bad seats, but one could get lucky, personally, i'll be standing.
 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
Assuming it is a standing gig, then rows 1 to 20 in sections A to G will not exist for this gig.
The best seats in the house are sections E, D & C, rows 21 to 32, however, most of the front rows of these sections are held for the O2 premium club http://thepremiumclub.ie/

My experience on the presales has been bad seats, but one could get lucky, personally, i'll be standing.

Thanks fayf.

Good luck.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Oh yes, you're a sevconian alright, I bet it really annoys you that morrissey supports a united ireland, do you know you sound like a narrow- minded bigot?

(a) I've no idea what a "secovian" might be; (b) I'm okay with Morrissey supporting the idea of a united Ireland - he's pretty clueless about politics, generally (read the lyrics to the song, World Peace Is None of Your Business, for further details; and (c) I'm not sure how you'd justify your claim that I sound like, "like a narrow-minded bigot," but I look forward to your explanation (I recommend that you look up the definition of the word, "bigot," first, though).

My parents are irish, they just happened to live in the 6 counties that were partitioned off from the rest of ireland

If they were born and raised in Northern Ireland, that'd make them Northern Irish and British, just as you are Scottish and British. That's how international borders work.
 

fayf

Member
Presale codes are now available, in order to participate in the presale next Wednesday morning, for tickets for Morrissey's 3Arena Dublin gig - December 1st.

For O2 Ireland customers, text MORRISSEY to 51020, and you will receive a 9 digit presale code, which needs to be entered on the ticketmaster.ie Morrissey ticket purchase page.
The presale commences at 9am Wednesday morning. There are a limited number of tickets available on this pre-sale, so when they are gone, there gone. I have mine ready to go.
The direct link to the presale, will be online here on Wednesday morning http://music.o2online.ie/Artist/Details/267

Three Ireland customers can also participate in the presale, which works the same way, details here http://music.three.ie/Artist/Details/267
 

DubbalinGirl

Active Member
Do we know yet what the seating plan is yet? I'm hearing from friends in Dublin that all seated seats cannot stand during the show due to someone falling and dying years ago, is that the case?
 

fayf

Member
I assume its standing on the floor, but there does not seem to be any confirmation of this per say, so I don't actually know the seating plan.
I did e-mail MCD the promoter of this gig on Friday about this very question, but I have not heard back so far.

I will find out on the presale on Wednesday morning, as this will give a choice of standing if this is an available option.

This is the the standard seating layout plans
http://3arena.ie/3arena/new-page/seating-plan
The first is all seated, the second(further down) is standing throughout the floor area.

I am unaware of the restriction you speak of, as I have been at seated gigs at the venue in upper tier Blocks H to P and I have stood, but I have been a good few rows back from the front.

However, there is a complete restriction on standing in the some of the front rows in the seated upper tier - blocks H to P(row 33 and possibly more rows back). Maybe this is what you heard from your friends. It is not uncommon in venues of this size, as the seats are quite high up.
 
(a) I've no idea what a "secovian" might be; (b) I'm okay with Morrissey supporting the idea of a united Ireland - he's pretty clueless about politics, generally (read the lyrics to the song, World Peace Is None of Your Business, for further details; and (c) I'm not sure how you'd justify your claim that I sound like, "like a narrow-minded bigot," but I look forward to your explanation (I recommend that you look up the definition of the word, "bigot," first, though).



If they were born and raised in Northern Ireland, that'd make them Northern Irish and British, just as you are Scottish and British. That's how international borders work.
my parents hold a irish passport, my family have lived in that part of Ireland long before partition, they are irish not british, If you want to continue this debate grow a pair and register, what are you afraid of?
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Dublin, Lublin...what's with the blin cities Moz?
 

DubbalinGirl

Active Member
I am unaware of the restriction you speak of, as I have been at seated gigs at the venue in upper tier Blocks H to P and I have stood, but I have been a good few rows back from the front.

The only anecdotal evidence I can find online is a mention in the Depeche Mode forum that Andy Fletcher's wife was flipping out at Depeche Mode show there bc she was told by staff to sit, and she was in the VIP seated section. Hmmmm.....

I'm wondering if there will be seated vs. standing since with the O2 London onsale, those were two different links on Ticketmaster.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
my parents hold a irish passport, my family have lived in that part of Ireland long before partition, they are irish not british, If you want to continue this debate grow a pair and register, what are you afraid of?

Hold on a sec. It's you, specifically, and whether you are Irish, that we're talking about. You are the Plastic Paddy under consideration, here.

On the tangentially related subject of your parents' nationality, though, I'm going to assume - and you can correct me if I'm wrong - that they were not born before the early 1920s and that, therefore, they have always been British and Northern Irish citizens.

On the subject of passports, even you - a British citizen living in Scotland - could apply for an Irish passport, so it's pretty meaningless as a definitive indication of a person's nationality. It's just a piece of paper. If you reply by telling me you have an Irish passport, that'd just confirm my categorisation of you as a Plastic Paddy - somebody who is not Irish, has never even lived there and wasn't socialised into exclusionary Gaelic Irish culture, but wants to pretend (for some ridiculous reason) that you're somehow Irish.

(On the question of whether I want to "continue this debate" with you: I'm not debating anything; I'm just mocking your stupidity and your pretensions to Oirishness.)
 

fayf

Member
The only anecdotal evidence I can find online is a mention in the Depeche Mode forum that Andy Fletcher's wife was flipping out at Depeche Mode show there bc she was told by staff to sit, and she was in the VIP seated section. Hmmmm.....

She would have been seated in the first row of, probably section D, there must be a ban on standing in the first few rows of the upper seats, but I dont believe this applies to seats in general as I have stood while having a seat, and there was no issue. It's a bit of a moot point, as it is difficult to get front row seats for the best section which is "D", but also C & E.


I'm wondering if there will be seated vs. standing since with the O2 London onsale, those were two different links on Ticketmaster.

I would assume so. It's a fair assumption that the floor will be standing, seeing as the O2 London is.
 
Hold on a sec. It's you, specifically, and whether you are Irish, that we're talking about. You are the Plastic Paddy under consideration, here.

On the tangentially related subject of your parents' nationality, though, I'm going to assume - and you can correct me if I'm wrong - that they were not born before the early 1920s and that, therefore, they have always been British and Northern Irish citizens.

On the subject of passports, even you - a British citizen living in Scotland - could apply for an Irish passport, so it's pretty meaningless as a definitive indication of a person's nationality. It's just a piece of paper. If you reply by telling me you have an Irish passport, that'd just confirm my categorisation of you as a Plastic Paddy - somebody who is not Irish, has never even lived there and wasn't socialised into exclusionary Gaelic Irish culture, but wants to pretend (for some ridiculous reason) that you're somehow Irish.

(On the question of whether I want to "continue this debate" with you: I'm not debating anything; I'm just mocking your stupidity and your pretensions to Oirishness.)

Why don't you register? Are you a rangers fan? You're anti- irish comments would suggest you are, are you embarrassed to admit it? I would be, if you had any knowledge whatsoever you would know that under the terms of the Good Friday agreement anyone born in the six counties can choose whether they are irish or British, do me a favour, walk down the Falls road and tell the people there that they are british not irish, good luck with that, damn I've done it again, replied to annonyMOUSE
 

fayf

Member
The Morrisey Ticketmaster.ie page is now showing a default seating plan of "Floor Standing".
http://www.ticketmaster.ie/morrisse...rtistid=770791&majorcatid=10001&minorcatid=60

Initially, when the page was first put up, it had been deafulting to the "all seated" plan, however this has now been changed,
which in the absence of an official written confirmation, can only mean the floor is fully standing as suspected.

Why they confuse people, by initially putting up a default "all seated" plan is beyond me, but at least gives clarification to the issue.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hold on a sec. It's you, specifically, and whether you are Irish, that we're talking about. You are the Plastic Paddy under consideration, here.

On the tangentially related subject of your parents' nationality, though, I'm going to assume - and you can correct me if I'm wrong - that they were not born before the early 1920s and that, therefore, they have always been British and Northern Irish citizens.

On the subject of passports, even you - a British citizen living in Scotland - could apply for an Irish passport, so it's pretty meaningless as a definitive indication of a person's nationality. It's just a piece of paper. If you reply by telling me you have an Irish passport, that'd just confirm my categorisation of you as a Plastic Paddy - somebody who is not Irish, has never even lived there and wasn't socialised into exclusionary Gaelic Irish culture, but wants to pretend (for some ridiculous reason) that you're somehow Irish.

(On the question of whether I want to "continue this debate" with you: I'm not debating anything; I'm just mocking your stupidity and your pretensions to Oirishness.)

1. Northern Ireland is part of the UK, not Britain. Check out your passport: 'United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland'.

2. "Plastic paddy" is a derisive (and rather tired) term used to denigrate people who identify partly or wholly with their family's history and culture, and the emigrant culture in which they were raised. Is the same logic applied to people born in England of, say, Italian, Jamaican or Pakistani descent who partly or wholly identify themselves with their family's history and culture?

3. It is not ridiculous for people of Irish descent to partly or wholly identify themselves as Irish. It is perfectly reasonable. Are you suggesting that they are completely unconnected to their family's history and culture, and the emigrant culture in which they were raised? Check out the literature on this topic.

4. This raises the question of who has authority regarding people's self-identification. Why do you wish to deride someone else's (perfectly reasonable) identification with their family's history and culture, and the culture in which they were raised. Why is this so threatening?
 

Johnny Barleycorn

Well-Known Member
I assume its standing on the floor,

I can confirm this.

Hold on a sec. It's you, specifically, and whether you are Irish, that we're talking about. You are the Plastic Paddy under consideration, here.

(On the question of whether I want to "continue this debate" with you: I'm not debating anything; I'm just mocking your stupidity and your pretensions to Oirishness.)

Irish is British, and he doesn't like it very much. He has a romanticised, nationalistic vision of Ireland, a pig over one shoulder and an Armalite over the other. It's very sweet, really.
 
L

Luke Action McClure

Guest
Hold on a sec. It's you, specifically, and whether you are Irish, that we're talking about. You are the Plastic Paddy under consideration, here.

On the tangentially related subject of your parents' nationality, though, I'm going to assume - and you can correct me if I'm wrong - that they were not born before the early 1920s and that, therefore, they have always been British and Northern Irish citizens.

On the subject of passports, even you - a British citizen living in Scotland - could apply for an Irish passport, so it's pretty meaningless as a definitive indication of a person's nationality. It's just a piece of paper. If you reply by telling me you have an Irish passport, that'd just confirm my categorisation of you as a Plastic Paddy - somebody who is not Irish, has never even lived there and wasn't socialised into exclusionary Gaelic Irish culture, but wants to pretend (for some ridiculous reason) that you're somehow Irish.

(On the question of whether I want to "continue this debate" with you: I'm not debating anything; I'm just mocking your stupidity and your pretensions to Oirishness.)

Spot on. Far too many pricks the world over who go mental on St Paddy's Day and then bring up their Oirish roots. So painful.
 
Come on barleycorn, you like to pretend you're intelligent, under the terms of the Good Friday agreement anyone born in the six counties can choose their nationality, irish or British, the point raised about the British passport is a valid point, it reads Britain and Northern Ireland, look out your passport and check it, but then you probably don't have one, you sound as if you've never been out of engerland, McClure are you calling johnny marr a prick? After all he recently stated that he feels more irish than english
 

fayf

Member
Anonymous, Irish Blood Irish Heart, Luke Action McClure, Johnny Barlecorn.

Any chance, yee can take these completely off topic political debates somewhere else, or set up a new thread and bash yeere issues out there.
 

Bluebirds

Well-Known Member
Presale codes are now available, in order to participate in the presale next Wednesday morning, for tickets for Morrissey's 3Arena Dublin gig - December 1st.

For O2 Ireland customers, text MORRISSEY to 51020, and you will receive a 9 digit presale code, which needs to be entered on the ticketmaster.ie Morrissey ticket purchase page.
The presale commences at 9am Wednesday morning. There are a limited number of tickets available on this pre-sale, so when they are gone, there gone. I have mine ready to go.
The direct link to the presale, will be online here on Wednesday morning http://music.o2online.ie/Artist/Details/267

Three Ireland customers can also participate in the presale, which works the same way, details here http://music.three.ie/Artist/Details/267

Does Three Ireland apply to Three UK? I think you mentioned earlier it might.

I've got an IPad on 3 Pay-as-you-go so assume I am a customer
 

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