Disasterpieces

Verso

Well-Known Member
Agree wholeheartedly. Too bad that rockabilly EP never came to fruition. Also: bring back the sideburns!
I think, at a certain point, Morrissey felt like he needed to augment his persona with harder edged music. I never found the tough guy act particularly convincing and usually don't think it suits him musically. For me, the nadir was "I Will See You in Far-Off Places." I remember the dread in seeing that accordion come out, woof.

For me, his strengths shine in those lighter moments. Give me a setlist with "My Love Life" and "Driving Your Girlfriend Home" and stuff like that.
 

Gregor Samsa

I straighten up, and my position is one of hope.
I think, at a certain point, Morrissey felt like he needed to augment his persona with harder edged music. I never found the tough guy act particularly convincing and usually don't think it suits him musically. For me, the nadir was "I Will See You in Far-Off Places." I remember the dread in seeing that accordion come out, woof.

For me, his strengths shine in those lighter moments. Give me a setlist with "My Love Life" and "Driving Your Girlfriend Home" and stuff like that.
I don’t mind a bit of Moz the Bruiser from the 90s, especially not if there’s some rockabilly involved. But of course, the Moz I fell in love with is the warm, melancholic, empathetic guy who wrote stuff like the songs you mentioned and Vauxhall and I.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Well-Known Member
I think, at a certain point, Morrissey felt like he needed to augment his persona with harder edged music. I never found the tough guy act particularly convincing and usually don't think it suits him musically. For me, the nadir was "I Will See You in Far-Off Places." I remember the dread in seeing that accordion come out, woof.

For me, his strengths shine in those lighter moments. Give me a setlist with "My Love Life" and "Driving Your Girlfriend Home" and stuff like that.
The strongest songs on more recent tours were without a doubt the softer ones.
Seasick, I've Changed My Plea, At Amber, I Won't Share You, Home Is A Question Mark, Morning Starship etc.

Driving Your Girlfriend Home is so beautiful, would love to see that one make a return.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
I don’t mind a bit of Moz the Bruiser from the 90s, especially not if there’s some rockabilly involved. But of course, the Moz I fell in love with is the warm, melancholic, empathetic guy who wrote stuff like the songs you mentioned and Vauxhall and I.
Ha, I still consider the "bruiser" stuff from the 90s pretty wimpy! I love that stuff. Maladjusted, Satan Rejected My Soul, You Must Please Remember, stuff like that. There's still a lot of space and atmosphere and in the case of "Satan," there's levity in the lyrics. I suppose if I'm being honest, what I'm actually talking about is the way that the material changed after Alain departed.
 

Gregor Samsa

I straighten up, and my position is one of hope.
Ha, I still consider the "bruiser" stuff from the 90s pretty wimpy! I love that stuff. Maladjusted, Satan Rejected My Soul, You Must Please Remember, stuff like that. There's still a lot of space and atmosphere and in the case of "Satan," there's levity in the lyrics. I suppose if I'm being honest, what I'm actually talking about is the way that the material changed after Alain departed.
There’s a coldness in the some of the lyrics on the last three albums, which I find appalling. Especially on WP and LIHS. I don’t know if that’s what you mean, but that’s what bugs me about latter day Moz.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
There’s a coldness in the some of the lyrics on the last three albums, which I find appalling. Especially on WP and LIHS. I don’t know if that’s what you mean, but that’s what bugs me about latter day Moz.
I agree. The music is overbearing and the words underwhelming. I haven't found Morrissey's music to be quotable or the lyrics to even be especially memorable for a long time. I find that pretty tragic, since that's the primary reason I listen to Morrissey.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I think, at a certain point, Morrissey felt like he needed to augment his persona with harder edged music. I never found the tough guy act particularly convincing and usually don't think it suits him musically. For me, the nadir was "I Will See You in Far-Off Places." I remember the dread in seeing that accordion come out, woof.

For me, his strengths shine in those lighter moments. Give me a setlist with "My Love Life" and "Driving Your Girlfriend Home" and stuff like that.
I remember seeing I Will See You In Far Off Places in Edinburgh a few years ago and the song had been really ramped up to Morrissey meets Led Zeppelin levels and it was incredible, brought the house down!
 

Ketamine Sun

HANG THEM HIGH VERONICA
In reviewing comments from the learned (thanks), on balance, I now think we have an initial list, in no particular order:

  1. This Song Doesn't End When It's Over
  2. People Are The Same Everywhere
  3. All The Young People Must Fall in Love
  4. Journalists Who Lie*
  5. Get Off The Stage*
  6. Neal Cassady Drops Dead
  7. At Last I Am Born
  8. Found Found Found
  9. One Day Goodbye Will Be Farewell
  10. The Kid's A Looker*
  11. Scandinavia
  12. Oh phoney
  13. Who will protect us from the police?
  14. I Bury The Living
  15. Children in Pieces*
* I quite like these 4, so personally wouldn't cast them into the 'disasterpiece' pile.

Dream set list ! :love:
 

reelfountain

On Timeout
Amazing song. Hypnotic!
The sample of the woman laughing really reminds me of the laugh in Suffer Little Children. Quite sinister. Very enchanting piece - and I think the lyrics are enchanting.

Morrissey always does new things - he never stands still. It's quite sad that some of his fans want him stuck in 1994 forever.
 

Gregor Samsa

I straighten up, and my position is one of hope.
I agree. The music is overbearing and the words underwhelming. I haven't found Morrissey's music to be quotable or the lyrics to even be especially memorable for a long time. I find that pretty tragic, since that's the primary reason I listen to Morrissey.
I think the Dog album was a return to form in every way, and there are strong numbers on both WP and LIHS, but yeah...I understand how you feel just the same.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
To me Morrissey shines in The Secret of Music. I like avant garde Moz.
One of the only songs I listened to more than once on the new one. I wouldn't exactly call it avant garde, but I agree that Morrissey should probably ditch traditional song structures for a while. I'd actually love a whole album of shit like Secret of Music, Sweetie Pie, etc.
 

GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Well-Known Member
I remember seeing I Will See You In Far Off Places in Edinburgh a few years ago and the song had been really ramped up to Morrissey meets Led Zeppelin levels and it was incredible, brought the house down!
I remember seeing a video from the 2016 (?) tour, I think it was Manchester, and the crowd really went wild. Especially when he sang the "and if the U! S! A! doesn't bomb you" part
 

reelfountain

On Timeout
One of the only songs I listened to more than once on the new one. I wouldn't exactly call it avant garde, but I agree that Morrissey should probably ditch traditional song structures for a while. I'd actually love a whole album of shit like Secret of Music, Sweetie Pie, etc.
You've got to admit that Jim Jim Falls is compelling - and Darling I hug a Pillow is brutally honest.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
You've got to admit that Jim Jim Falls is compelling - and Darling I hug a Pillow is brutally honest.
I just simply cannot get into of those songs at all. Can't stand the melodies, don't think the lyrics are interesting at all. I honestly say this without any condescending intention, but Morrissey's band and their producer really employ elements of "electronic music" in such a dated and amateurish way that the second I hear those synths or drum machines, it just sounds to me like a bunch of old people in a studio pressing random buttons in a desperate attempt to make a song sound contemporary.
 

reelfountain

On Timeout
I just simply cannot get into of those songs at all. Can't stand the melodies, don't think the lyrics are interesting at all. I honestly say this without any condescending intention, but Morrissey's band and their producer really employ elements of "electronic music" in such a dated and amateurish way that the second I hear those synths or drum machines, it just sounds to me like a bunch of old people in a studio pressing random buttons in a desperate attempt to make a song sound contemporary.
A fair few contemporary indie bands in England are using this 'amaturish' sound to purposely sound 'early electronic'. The 'pressing random buttons' thing is a good way of describing it. Whether you like Moz's band's effort or not is a matter of personal taste.

I think Moz is exploring new ground here. It's good to keep moving and trying new sounds. He surprised a lot of reviewers with this album - even the NME liked it. From the early 90s up until High School his didn't differ his sound in any radical way, so it's refreshing.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
A fair few contemporary indie bands in England are using this 'amaturish' sound to purposely sound 'early electronic'. The 'pressing random buttons' thing is a good way of describing it. Whether you like Moz's band's effort or not is a matter of personal taste.

I think Moz is exploring new ground here. It's good to keep moving and trying new sounds. He surprised a lot of reviewers with this album - even the NME liked it. From the early 90s up until High School his didn't differ his sound in any radical way, so it's refreshing.
Yeah. I mostly listen to ambient / electronic music, so maybe I'm just more fickle when it comes to that particular sonic palette. I don't call indiscriminately slapping a canned drum beat on top of a song to be especially "explorative." Definitely not where his or his band's strengths lie. Even The Secret of Music is simply rock music, but at least they're approaching it from a different angle, experimenting with tempo and rhythm and whatnot.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I remember seeing a video from the 2016 (?) tour, I think it was Manchester, and the crowd really went wild. Especially when he sang the "and if the U! S! A! doesn't bomb you" part
Yeah I was at that gig and then went to Edinburgh cupla days later at The Usher Hall which is smaller than The Manc Arena and I swear I thought the building was going to crumble with the wall of sound they created, great memories!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Yeah. I mostly listen to ambient / electronic music, so maybe I'm just more fickle when it comes to that particular sonic palette. I don't call indiscriminately slapping a canned drum beat on top of a song to be especially "explorative." Definitely not where his or his band's strengths lie. Even The Secret of Music is simply rock music, but at least they're approaching it from a different angle, experimenting with tempo and rhythm and whatnot.
You know I was surprised & disappointed that no Boz co-writes made it onto Dog. The song Brow Of My Beloved which was released relatively close to Dog was a Boz tune and it's a classic Moz & Boz collaboration. I don't mind the change in direction for Dog as Moz never really stands still but I do love Boz's compositions which are predominantly guitar based efforts.
 
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