David Bowie dies at 69

Comments

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Anonymous

Guest
It's perfectly understandable that Morrissey would take longer than other "celebrities" to write a statement. In the early 70s he was a clunky, starstruck schoolboy (in uniform!) asking for Bowie's autography at a concert venue. 20-odd years later Bowie is covering a song of his and joining him on stage. I'm sure Morrissey is not only devastated over David Bowie's passing, but feeling his own mortality.
Patience!
Yes, I can feel from Morrissey's performances (sorry, he doesn't like that word) that he is somehow feeling his own mortality. His songs are sung with much less joviality, there is a certain seriousness in his voice. He almost reminds me of a priest talking/singing to his congregation. It must be a very anxious feeling knowing you've lived that long, contributed to the artistic world so much only to be remembered at some point. Nobody wants to die, especially someone of his importance and influence. Just the thought of this being one day over must be excruciatingly painful.
I wish Mr. Morrissey long and healthy life. I hope there is much more to come, whether it will be another record, book or some other delightful surprise.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Re: David Bowie has died

At least Bowie wasn't a spiteful prick. That being said, long live Morrissey. He's a good dude underneath it all.
Who the hell are you referring to? You can call your skateboarding buddy a good dude. Show some respect. Same goes for the British-Butt-Plug. Please say something that will make your mom proud of you.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
For some reason, I'm more interested in a comment from David Sylvian. David Sylvian always struck me as Bowie's ambitious, "overdoing it" kid brother who eventually surpassed Bowie in the realms of musical experimentation (I felt Bowie relied on Scott Walker recently as an inspiration. David Sylvian went waaayyy past Scott Walker).

It's a shame Morrissey turned publicly on Bowie. I thought their tour was a dumb idea, though.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
"Smiling keenly, he accepts the note of a dull schoolboy whose overblown soul is more ablaze than the school blazer he wears..."
Yikes - reading this prose, you can just sense the folly of 'List of the Lost' aching to be born.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
wouldn't be surprised. Bowie is Britain's Elvis and M.Jackson (but with more creative depth)in one. Not only their loss,but the worlds greatest loss also. Who do we have left now to carry that torch that guided us all that cared to venture into stranger worlds of sadness and wonder? M is definitely at the top of that list,if not the top itself.
You seriously need to get laid, whoever you are. Just STFU FFS!!!!!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Morrissey has been on tour for a year and a half, he probably wants to be out of thr public eye for a while. I didn't expect any kind of word from him for a while. Sure he is a bit depressed too, going from a lot of business to nothing. I miss him like you all do, i wish he was sitting in my lap right now, i would give him a big hug. DD
 

sistasheila

tjekket
quite a beautiful Review i found
http://www.autostraddle.com/our-bowies-ourselves-323665/

Before I knew I was a bisexual femme, I knew there was David Bowie.

As the kind of little girl who refused to wear pants, only dresses, I worshipped the holy trinity of Disney princesses: Belle, Ariel, Jasmine. I could apply lipstick perfectly by the time I was eight.

giphy

It would be easy to say that the first time I watched Labyrinth, everything changed. Maybe it was the third time I watched it, or the seventh, or the thirteenth. I remember the videotape we had was recorded from somewhere else, so the beginning, where the owl is flying through the sky, was always all wobbly.

But the Goblin King was not.

I was transfixed. I remember sitting on the carpet beneath the TV, as close as I could get before my mom would yell at me, staring up, seduced completely by the bountiful pirate sleeves and atom-bomb hair and glam-as-f*** makeup.

I didn’t know if I wanted to be him or have sex with him or what. I still don’t, entirely.

I could not fathom why Jennifer Connelly — I can hear, precisely, in my mind the way Bowie calls her “Sarah,” with a slight British lilt — did not just ditch that screaming baby and rule with the Goblin King forever and ever. Maybe I actually wanted to be her. Maybe it doesn’t matter.

I was his. He was the closest thing I had to magic. And I didn’t even know about the bisexual connection yet.

There’s this great quote from the Strange Fascination: David Bowie: The Definitive Story by David Buckley: “Bowie’s openly bisexual stance united all those psychically and sexually dispossessed people looking for a symbol for their own feelings of insecurity and lack of rootedness. As a bisexual mainstream pop star, Bowie represented taboo-smashing, rule-breaking and experimentation.”

Of course when I played my parent’s cassette tape of “Let’s Dance” on repeat for two years, I didn’t think of it as groundbreaking. It was almost the opposite. I was a slightly chubby pre-teen who desperately wanted to fit in with my sports-playing basic-ass peers, but I loved dressing up in sequined outfits and painting my eyelids elaborate colors. I would dance around my bubblegum pink room to “China Girl” and “Modern Love.” It was my misfit soundtrack.

One time a few popular girls came over and I put it on for us to practice our dance class choreography to and when one of them missed a step in the middle of it, she stopped and exclaimed, “What even is this music? Don’t you have anything else?” I was mortified. I almost threw the tape away when they left. It took me a very long time to realize that the joke’s on her.

We use the term icon pretty loosely these days but Bowie, well, he’s so very many icons, all at once. A shapeshifter with staggering breadth and depth. A presence at once epic and intimate. My andro-glam Bowie is different than your Bowie, is different than everyone else’s Bowie. There’s power in that. And hope. It’s the legions of us Bowie-loving misfits, perhaps, who shall inherit the earth.

So today let’s celebrate all the Bowies that he was, all the heroes. Let’s grab our crystal balls and our spandex and our glitter like stardust. Let’s put on our red shoes and take off our shirts and paint our faces. Let’s slick our hair back. Let’s dance.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
"Smiling keenly, he accepts the note of a dull schoolboy whose overblown soul is more ablaze than the school blazer he wears..."
Yikes - reading this prose, you can just sense the folly of 'List of the Lost' aching to be born.
Bloody awful!
 

Anaesthesine

Angel of Distemper
I am very sad about it. Maybe he was the perfect pop star, but he hadn't a perfect career. Nobody has, infact, but with some artist people seem to forget a lot of things, with other artists they don't. Strange world.
Bowie's career had quite a few misses it's true: periods when he seemed too slick, inauthentic and, ultimately, dull. Years went by when I didn't listen to his music at all, but he always brought me back 'round when he'd found an interesting new muse. There are other artists who went further out on a creative limb, but Bowie's fame allowed him to beam the revolution into living rooms everywhere. Even when his music was uninspiring, Bowie himself was always beautiful in his pan-gendered, otherworldly way. And yet he seemed like a local: he frequently worked in my NYC neighborhood, and he was sometimes spotted at a tiny bodega down the street where they cooked on a hot plate and a microwave. Adonis on a lunch break.

Bowie wasn't perfect by any means: he had business dealings that ruffled quite a few feathers, and his treatment of the fragile Klaus Nomi was rumored to have been less than charitable. There are enough tales of his extreme narcissism, and lord knows what he got up to when he was on one of his drug-induced binges. Still, for a living icon he made remarkably few enemies, and remarkably few missteps.

The number of conversations I've had in the last 24 hours with old friends who are shaken by his death has surprised me. My own reaction has surprised me. I'm not usually affected by the deaths of "celebrities," but Bowie was something else entirely. He changed my life, he changed the lives of people I know (living and dead). More than any other performer I can think of, Bowie seemed immortal. He may well have been the most charismatic man on the planet. He was radiant. Much is forgiven a talent that huge, an intellect that vast, and a glamor that powerful.
 
Bowie's career had quite a few misses it's true: periods when he seemed too slick, inauthentic and, ultimately, dull. Years went by when I didn't listen to his music at all, but he always brought me back 'round when he'd found an interesting new muse. There are other artists who went further out on a creative limb, but Bowie's fame allowed him to beam the revolution into living rooms everywhere. Even when his music was uninspiring, Bowie himself was always beautiful in his pan-gendered, otherworldly way. And yet he seemed like a local: he frequently worked in my NYC neighborhood, and he was sometimes spotted at a tiny bodega down the street where they cooked on a hot plate and a microwave. Adonis on a lunch break.

Bowie wasn't perfect by any means: he had business dealings that ruffled quite a few feathers, and his treatment of the fragile Klaus Nomi was rumored to have been less than charitable. There are enough tales of his extreme narcissism, and lord knows what he got up to when he was on one of his drug-induced binges. Still, for a living icon he made remarkably few enemies, and remarkably few missteps.

The number of conversations I've had in the last 24 hours with old friends who are shaken by his death has surprised me. My own reaction has surprised me. I'm not usually affected by the deaths of "celebrities," but Bowie was something else entirely. He changed my life, he changed the lives of people I know (living and dead). More than any other performer I can think of, Bowie seemed immortal. He may well have been the most charismatic man on the planet. He was radiant. Much is forgiven a talent that huge, an intellect that vast, and a glamor that powerful.
From what i've read on twitter and tumblr, a lot of people are upset most people forget he slept with underage groupies and stuff. I think we should celebrate his life and deal with that later, but i can understand why are they angry about it
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Morrissey has been on tour for a year and a half, he probably wants to be out of thr public eye for a while. I didn't expect any kind of word from him for a while. Sure he is a bit depressed too, going from a lot of business to nothing. I miss him like you all do, i wish he was sitting in my lap right now, i would give him a big hug. DD
You need help seriously need help see a doctor
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The first condolence I read on social media was a heartfelt message from David Beckham thanking Bowie for being an inspiration, lol. I am still trying to work out what inspiration Bowie could possibly have given Beckham? Morrissey I guess, will either give a geniune tribute or no tribute, but it certainly won't be just to join in the mourn fest. There's more floral displays in Brixton today than you'll see at Honor Oak all year
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Bowie's career had quite a few misses it's true: periods when he seemed too slick, inauthentic and, ultimately, dull. Years went by when I didn't listen to his music at all, but he always brought me back 'round when he'd found an interesting new muse. There are other artists who went further out on a creative limb, but Bowie's fame allowed him to beam the revolution into living rooms everywhere. Even when his music was uninspiring, Bowie himself was always beautiful in his pan-gendered, otherworldly way. And yet he seemed like a local: he frequently worked in my NYC neighborhood, and he was sometimes spotted at a tiny bodega down the street where they cooked on a hot plate and a microwave. Adonis on a lunch break.

Bowie wasn't perfect by any means: he had business dealings that ruffled quite a few feathers, and his treatment of the fragile Klaus Nomi was rumored to have been less than charitable. There are enough tales of his extreme narcissism, and lord knows what he got up to when he was on one of his drug-induced binges. Still, for a living icon he made remarkably few enemies, and remarkably few missteps.

The number of conversations I've had in the last 24 hours with old friends who are shaken by his death has surprised me. My own reaction has surprised me. I'm not usually affected by the deaths of "celebrities," but Bowie was something else entirely. He changed my life, he changed the lives of people I know (living and dead). More than any other performer I can think of, Bowie seemed immortal. He may well have been the most charismatic man on the planet. He was radiant. Much is forgiven a talent that huge, an intellect that vast, and a glamor that powerful.
Strange. I know what you and others mean about Bowie's charisma and it's surely huge but it doesn't reach me. I can't explain it. It's silly. Further, although I love his music, I'm not really emotionally drawn to it. That's how I feel.
 

Harsh Truth

Ever Felt Had?
So Morrissey will quickly type up a post about the passing of Lynn Anderson (with all due respect to the late Ms. Anderson.... I use her simply an example) or post a photo of a goat standing in a field in Bulgaria, but he is seriously not going to write anything about the death of David Bowie?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
You need help seriously need help see a doctor
Lighten up , not everyone takes himself so seriously as you it was obviously a joke. Not everyone is miserable and can joke around a bit. Btw, who wouldn't want Morrissey in their lap.
 

TheBoyWithTheDragonTattoo

Accountant, rampant.
Maybe Morrissey rightly feels silly or ashamed of himself for running around claiming he had Cancer and trying to drum up support/sympathy when Bowie actually did have Cancer and kept it to himself. Bowie goes out making a statement with his art that makes "if I die, then I die" seem even smaller than it did when Moz first vomited the words. I'm sorry but claiming Barrett's Esophagus IS Cancer- or letting people draw that conclusion without forcefully clearing up the matter is lower than low.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The first condolence I read on social media was a heartfelt message from David Beckham thanking Bowie for being an inspiration, lol. I am still trying to work out what inspiration Bowie could possibly have given Beckham? Morrissey I guess, will either give a geniune tribute or no tribute, but it certainly won't be just to join in the mourn fest. There's more floral displays in Brixton today than you'll see at Honor Oak all year
Perhaps Bowie was a manscaping muse for him? Who cares anyway?! Beckham is a knockout, not to state the obvious. Would help if he kept his mouth shut though.
 

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