choc-a-bloc books

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Do you think Morrissey uses the term choc-a-bloc to mean "many," as in a lot of books? Or do you think he's making a reference to the early 80s BBC children's show Chock-a-Block and is using the term to mean "children's books"?
 

Uncleskinny

It's all good
Subscriber
Do you think Morrissey uses the term choc-a-bloc to mean "many," as in a lot of books? Or do you think he's making a reference to the early 80s BBC children's show Chock-a-Block and is using the term to mean "children's books"?
Just to mean "absolutely crammed with", I'd say.

P.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Do you guys think that when he says "And if it breaks your heart/legs than don't come running to me" it's the girl studying speaking? Or Morrissey?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Its morrissey speaking as the "dad", "boyfriend", generally anyone who puts pressure on their kids to get good grades above all else, no matter what the consequences. That's what it sounds like to me anyway, sure someone else has a different interpritation.
 

Tingle3

Member
In that lyric it's clear that when Morrissey is quoting the sweet daddy or the lovely boyfriend their words are in quotes, (as printed in the lyric booklet). When Morrissey says "and if you break your legs then don't come running to me" he's speaking as himself - as a third party telling the girl that she needn't turn to him (Morrissey) for sympathy because he's warned her that University just isn't all it's cracked up to be. And because it's funny it can be attributed to Morrissey 'iself.

BTW 'Choc-a-bloc books' would simply refer simply to having maybe a shelf full of books or a room full of books or a bag packed with books. In England we say things like "The train was choc-a-bloc" this morning if it was very full or "Town was choc-a-bloc" on Christmas Eve for example. We don't think about what it means!
 

Chickpea

pithy yet degenerate
In that lyric it's clear that when Morrissey is quoting the sweet daddy or the lovely boyfriend their words are in quotes, (as printed in the lyric booklet). When Morrissey says "and if you break your legs then don't come running to me" he's speaking as himself - as a third party telling the girl that she needn't turn to him (Morrissey) for sympathy because he's warned her that University just isn't all it's cracked up to be. And because it's funny it can be attributed to Morrissey 'iself.
I agree with this interpretation!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Unless less than 5 and a couple of hours at the library qualify as chock-a-block (preferred spelling, if nobody minds), I believe that was poetic license on somebody's part.
There probably wasn't even that much chocolate involved.

I think that, never having had to study anything, except for American actors' hairstyles, somebody let his imagination run free on this one... How, er, endearing!
 

21punksalute

Junior Member
I find this part of the song difficult to sing along to. I can only get it right when I'm looking at the lyrics. I also often screw up the " big fat locker room hockey jock laughing" lyrics. God, it feels so good the times I do nail it tho.
 
Top Bottom