Britpop

Ben Budd

Well-Known Member
Literally cannot wait to see Rozza play Manchester next month. I'm too young to have been a fan of Gene in their heyday so to see Mr Rossiter play anything by them will be an incredible moment for me.

Going to go listen to 'You'll Never Walk Again' now.
 

Fury

New Member
Stephen Duffy and Nick Heyward both released albums at the height of Britpop and both albums had a distinctly "Britpop" flavour to them...I would imagine both tracks I included can be found on youTube so that you can get the idea. While both men have careers that stretch way before and beyond that scene they did release music that was part of it.

Sorry.

Terry Hall is an interesting one...like Morrissey he was viewed VERY fondly by those of us who were part of things. His music at that time wasn't as obviously "Britpop" but I included him because I loved the album love him and he was a key influence on ALL of the bands who were part of the scene.

Sorry.

"There She Goes" was played in every Britpop club, in every town, every single week...OK, they had long given up the ghost but the sound, the stubborn revivalism were all very influential on what came between '92 and '98.

Sorry.

"Ladies and Gentlemen..." was a very important album during the Britpop years; I bought it on the same day as I bought "When I Was Born For the Seventh Time" by Cornershop (who I should have included). The use of brass and choirs across that album was a big influence on many acts at that time and it was a part of my Britpop experience.

Sorry.

The Charlatans just were Britpop. Like Blur they had come out of the baggy/madchester scene, grown, developed and become integral to the revival of interest in British bands in the wake of the dire grunge scene.

Sorry.

I guess it's all about definitions...but as someone who was there (in London, in Edinburgh, in Glasgow, as a fan and as a budding musician) the whole scene stretched way beyond the narrow definition that so many people have. Chemical Brothers, Faithless, Portishead, Tricky and other non guitar bands were all part of the soundtrack of the time too as were the likes of S*M*A*S*H and Blessed Ethel...dance, punk, soul, pop; Britpop was a lot more than just [email protected] and Sleeper.
Very well said.
 
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