Any Other Teacher-Moz Fans Out There?

A

Angel

Guest
I'm just a plain and boring 7th grade teacher wondering if any others like me exist? I'm a huge Moz/Smiths fan of 10 years, but I'm only 25. Am I the only one who gets 180 blank stares when I make a Moz reference to a bunch of 12 year olds? Just curious.

P.S.
We really can be afraid of the pupils, but not always!
 
S

Seasick

Guest
Angel, a fellow named peter cline used to grace these parts...he was a high school english teacher and used to mention the same "blank stares" as you. i would venture to say that since most adults have limited awareness of Morrissey, we wouldn't be able to imagine a twelve year old with this understanding. But, there's always hope....best of luck in your teaching efforts.
-seasick
 
C

Cabinsin

Guest
My good friend is a third grade teacher. Believe me, he is a huge moz fan. In fact he told me one time he was sitting in his room during his planning period listening to the Malajusted album. Wide to Receive was playing. He was singing along to it when a home room mother came in. He said she didn't quite know what to make of it. She gave an incredulous stare so he turned the music down. Like he said to me. I guess you just had to be there. I am sure there are many teachers out there like you and my friend.
 
B

bosie

Guest
You should make your students listen to Moz. My 9th grade English teacher made us listen to Harry Chapin songs and discuss the lyrics. It was very unconventional and it makes the kids think about what they are listening to. Let those 7th graders break free of 'nsync and britney spears. Introduce them to Morrissey. It's your job as an educator.
 
A

A Cheap Tray

Guest
I could not agree more with Bosie, when I was in the 7th grade I jumped on the ban Wagon and listend to Hip Hop just because "IT WAS COOL" Luckly I found Morrissey in 9th grade and all I could think was HOW COME I WAS NEVER INTRODUCED TO HIM BEFORE. I can safely say Morrissey has had a huge influence on my life.
So play some Moz for the kiddies I'm willing to bet good will come out of it.
 
J

Jimmy

Guest
> You should make your students listen to Moz. My 9th grade
> English teacher made us listen to Harry Chapin songs and discuss
> the lyrics. It was very unconventional and it makes the kids
> think about what they are listening to. Let those 7th graders
> break free of 'nsync and britney spears. Introduce them to
> Morrissey. It's your job as an educator.

There is nothing wrong with Britney Spears. She is a hottie!!
 
W

Wild ea Wake

Guest
"Here I Come to Save the Day!"

> I'm just a plain and boring 7th grade teacher wondering if any
> others like me exist? I'm a huge Moz/Smiths fan of 10 years, but
> I'm only 25. Am I the only one who gets 180 blank stares when I
> make a Moz reference to a bunch of 12 year olds? Just curious.
> P.S.
> We really can be afraid of the pupils, but not always!

Even educators sneak in movie theaters to see movies about crazy comedians. It seems that the Mighty Mouse theme has been trapped within my mind ever since.

I haven't posted recently even though I have dropped in from time to time to check on the tour. What a trip it has evidently been. We can truthfully say the Morrissey is back, and it's wonderful. I don't see all the fuss concerning the ethnic background of the concert goers though, since Morrissey fans are welcome regardless of skin color or language. This is not an exclusive club.

I have been known to play Smiths/Morrissey songs in classrooms, and I even used them for slide, overhead, and in the olden days, opaque presentations. I have had former students come back and gush about their collections, and thank me for the introduction to the music and lyrics of the Smiths and Morrissey.

Happy Holidays to all, for soon some of us will return to the classrooms.
 
A

Angel

Guest
Well, as I stated before I constantly refer to the man in question. However, even some of the most devout fans wouldn't understand me unless every moz/smiths tune was engraved in their brains. For example, during our last test there was a question about North and South posed by a student. Naturally, I blurted the words "I left the South, I traveled North. I got confused, I killed a horse, and I can't help the way I feel!" The response was WHAT? HUH? I replied "Nevermind, Nevermind!" It was pretty funny, actually.

I agree that I should introduce them to his genius, but I was never one for forcing others to like as I like. Morever, their minds are rather fragile. That's why N Sync seem to make more sense to them. Nevertheless, I have been blatently honest with them about what I do and don't do, like nor don't like. I'm an ex-hardcore/punk straightedge kid as well, so I stress the importance of sobriety, at least until they are older and clever enough to make the decision on whether or not to involve themselves in certain things. It is my job to mold their minds, not program them. Good night, and thank you!
 
M

maribel

Guest
Last year, before I went back to college, I helped tutor at my old high school. The teacher whose class I was helping out heard me talk about Morrissey to some of the 9th graders. I was talking about how I was going to see him in Santa Barbara and Coachella. The teacher couldn't believe that (1) I was a Morrissey fan, and (2) Morrissey was on tour again. He had been a long time Smiths fan, and so he got me into a long conversation about Morrissey, and since there was a computer in the classroom, he asked me if I knew where he could go to download mp3s, and so, of course, I took him to Frankly Vulgar. For the next few weeks, I brought my Morrissey and Smiths cds and we played them in class, despite the objections of all the lil 9th graders. Oh well, they'll never learn..thank God I did.

> I'm just a plain and boring 7th grade teacher wondering if any
> others like me exist? I'm a huge Moz/Smiths fan of 10 years, but
> I'm only 25. Am I the only one who gets 180 blank stares when I
> make a Moz reference to a bunch of 12 year olds? Just curious.

> P.S.
> We really can be afraid of the pupils, but not always!




I'd Love To
 
W

Wilde Lover

Guest
> I'm just a plain and boring 7th grade teacher wondering if any
> others like me exist? I'm a huge Moz/Smiths fan of 10 years, but
> I'm only 25. Am I the only one who gets 180 blank stares when I
> make a Moz reference to a bunch of 12 year olds? Just curious.

> P.S.
> We really can be afraid of the pupils, but not always!

I am a student of English Literature, and am a true fan of Morrissey's crafty lyrics. If there are any songs you would like to chat about ( or e-mail me at: [email protected] ), I'd be more than pleased to respond to any & all of your queries. I've been hooked since (ironically!) I was a 12 year-old, and am now 27...and perhaps no wiser. Anyway, I've been singing the songs too. I am perfectly obsessed with the 80's icons, and Mozz's 90's persona.
 
M

me

Guest
> I'm just a plain and boring 7th grade teacher wondering if any
> others like me exist? I'm a huge Moz/Smiths fan of 10 years, but
> I'm only 25. Am I the only one who gets 180 blank stares when I
> make a Moz reference to a bunch of 12 year olds? Just curious.

> P.S.
> We really can be afraid of the pupils, but not always!
well i'm still in college but i'll be taking on teaching in a few years and was wondering do they let you take sicks to see morrissey? that is my silly concern, hopefully i will be teaching secondary school and i plan on at least subjecting my students to at least one song and some oscar wilde! which song should i choose? i want to "infiltrate" their minds and have genius stay "emblazoned" on them but that's too much to ask for so i'll settle for hoping they read at least one of the assigned books.

tease, torment, and tantilize you students!

me
 
N

Now I Am a Wuss

Guest
> I'm just a plain and boring 7th grade teacher wondering if any
> others like me exist? I'm a huge Moz/Smiths fan of 10 years, but
> I'm only 25. Am I the only one who gets 180 blank stares when I
> make a Moz reference to a bunch of 12 year olds? Just curious.

> P.S.
> We really can be afraid of the pupils, but not always!

Since '94 I had been a graduate slave instructor of English composition at university, but I've given up education as a bad mistake. I used to have a few posters of Morrissey in my first TA office. Once in a while a student would come by (none of my own) and remark on how great Morrissey is.

I tried not to make any Morrissey references during class because I knew most kids wouldn't understand. I was also striving to avoid playing favourites in the cases where there were students who were avowed Morrissey fans. Should they get better grades and more attention from me than a student who's a Hootie & the Blowfish fan? Of course, the answer is academic. I have to say I quite enjoyed reading a well-written narrative from a student about meeting Morrissey. However, I am afraid that the bad experiences of teaching outweighed the good ones. I won't go into it, but I have found working at a porno website less degrading than teaching last year.

To be finished IS a relief.
 
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