An obsessed fan since 93, and I'm loving Years of Refusal

david13

New Member
I can understand those who love YOR and I can understand those who think it is merely OK, but I can't understand those who are actively disliking it.

I've been bought everything released by Moz; I've bought everything the first day it was released since 1993. I've seen him live 17 times. I've met him. I love lots of other artists too but I always come back to Morrissey; things will, I now concede, never change.

I've only listened to YOR in its entirety about five times, but to me it's supremely enjoyable stuff. Punchy, taut, thrusting, packed full of tunes, and a great listen.

I find it utterly impossible and completely pointless trying to compare Moz albums; each one belongs to a different time and place. All I know is that I'm in love with another set of Moz songs, each one unravelling beautifully with each listen.

David
 

Danny_

Forgot my login!
I think the people that hate it have certain issues or an agenda quite frankly. If I don't like a record it doesn't make me as angry as it seems to make them, I just listen to something else and avoid having to hear about it.
 

Drew a swallow

deep and blue
The internet has ruined looking forward to new albums for me - well primarilly Mozz albums. I succumbed to hearing Quarry and Ringleaders in their entirety before going to the shops to buy my copy. This time I'm going to wait. There's nothing like that feeling of going into HMV or wherever and picking up a copy of a new album you've been waiting to hear for ages, going to the checkout to pay for it and then travelling home reading the sleeve feeling all tingly and excited. I know one always has a choice, but temptation and reading what everyone says on here always seems to get to people, me....
 

Stanley the 2nd

Active Member
Welcome to the forum David13. I share the same opinion of YOR - it's a belter of an album. I've been a fan since 1992 and have seen the man live 16 times I believe, so we're coming in from the same angle. What no-one has said is that the album sounds very 2009 if that makes sense? It doesn't really look back to the past in any ways which is refreshing for once.
 

Deego

Lazyitis
The internet has ruined looking forward to new albums for me - well primarilly Mozz albums. I succumbed to hearing Quarry and Ringleaders in their entirety before going to the shops to buy my copy. This time I'm going to wait. There's nothing like that feeling of going into HMV or wherever and picking up a copy of a new album you've been waiting to hear for ages, going to the checkout to pay for it and then travelling home reading the sleeve feeling all tingly and excited. I know one always has a choice, but temptation and reading what everyone says on here always seems to get to people, me....

Spot on.
 

Your Arsenal

yes I am blind
uhh
ive been a fan since 93 too, but i dunno,
not sure if im loving the whole "live" sound.
im not sure im loving the album just yet :(
 

Ben Chill

New Member
I agree with the general sentiments of this thread.
Having bought everything The Smiths released (and a few things they didn't) as soon as they were in the shops I also miss that excitement of waiting to visit the record shop.
The internet has a lot to answer for, but it's here and we have to deal with it.
Of course the 'net gives us so much more that it would be foolish to resent it just because it has changed the music business.

I grew up in a place called Wythenshawe in south Manchester. It was and still is a very large housing estate mostly populated by people on a low income or unemployed.
When I first heard The Smiths all those years ago it changed my life. Strange as it may seem to some people I suddenly found something that I didn't even know I was looking for. A religious experience perhaps, as my whole life ever since has included this man, Morrissey.
His words were so special to a teenage boy with high hopes but low expectations.
Nothing mattered to me as much as the words and music of The Smiths. Every line was a celebration, a condemnation but with humour and intelligence that was unmatched in the pop music world, at least as far as I knew at the time.

So on the day a new record was released it was so important to me that even as a poor, working class boy who had no income whatsover and no parents to give me money, I somehow managed to raise the cash to get the bus into Manchester city centre and buy it.
And of course I read every line and verse, every credit and etched slogan that was on the sleeve and record on the journey home.
Those days are gone, but his music still retains that same importance in my life.

He has grown from a young man walking the streets of social housing in south Manchester into a man of wealth and influence.
I too have grown. (groan)
So his maturity produces a different kind of song than that made by the youth working hard to break out of the grubby estate.
My life changed too, it happens to most of us, and hopefully I have matured a bit along the way.

So the songs have changed, the music has changed, the way we first get to hear and own the recordings has changed. But for me, when I eventually sit down on my own and listen to that man sing I still feel the same as I did as a young guy listening to Hand In Glove, Ask, Strangeways, Meat Is Murder, Well I Wonder, Barbarism.. etc., the list is a long one.

With the single exception of some song about a plane crash in 1958 I have loved everything Morrissey has released as a solo artist.
And this new album is another perfect reminder of why my life changed.
Cheers Moz.
 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
I agree with the general sentiments of this thread.
Having bought everything The Smiths released (and a few things they didn't) as soon as they were in the shops I also miss that excitement of waiting to visit the record shop.
The internet has a lot to answer for, but it's here and we have to deal with it.
Of course the 'net gives us so much more that it would be foolish to resent it just because it has changed the music business.

I grew up in a place called Wythenshawe in south Manchester. It was and still is a very large housing estate mostly populated by people on a low income or unemployed.
When I first heard The Smiths all those years ago it changed my life. Strange as it may seem to some people I suddenly found something that I didn't even know I was looking for. A religious experience perhaps, as my whole life ever since has included this man, Morrissey.
His words were so special to a teenage boy with high hopes but low expectations.
Nothing mattered to me as much as the words and music of The Smiths. Every line was a celebration, a condemnation but with humour and intelligence that was unmatched in the pop music world, at least as far as I knew at the time.

So on the day a new record was released it was so important to me that even as a poor, working class boy who had no income whatsover and no parents to give me money, I somehow managed to raise the cash to get the bus into Manchester city centre and buy it.
And of course I read every line and verse, every credit and etched slogan that was on the sleeve and record on the journey home.
Those days are gone, but his music still retains that same importance in my life.

He has grown from a young man walking the streets of social housing in south Manchester into a man of wealth and influence.
I too have grown. (groan)
So his maturity produces a different kind of song than that made by the youth working hard to break out of the grubby estate.
My life changed too, it happens to most of us, and hopefully I have matured a bit along the way.

So the songs have changed, the music has changed, the way we first get to hear and own the recordings has changed. But for me, when I eventually sit down on my own and listen to that man sing I still feel the same as I did as a young guy listening to Hand In Glove, Ask, Strangeways, Meat Is Murder, Well I Wonder, Barbarism.. etc., the list is a long one.

With the single exception of some song about a plane crash in 1958 I have loved everything Morrissey has released as a solo artist.
And this new album is another perfect reminder of why my life changed.
Cheers Moz.
Post Of The Fortnight, Mr.Chill.
Kudos.
:guitar:
 

Walter Ego

Not Banned
I agree with the general sentiments of this thread.
Having bought everything The Smiths released (and a few things they didn't) as soon as they were in the shops I also miss that excitement of waiting to visit the record shop.
The internet has a lot to answer for, but it's here and we have to deal with it.
Of course the 'net gives us so much more that it would be foolish to resent it just because it has changed the music business.

I grew up in a place called Wythenshawe in south Manchester. It was and still is a very large housing estate mostly populated by people on a low income or unemployed.
When I first heard The Smiths all those years ago it changed my life. Strange as it may seem to some people I suddenly found something that I didn't even know I was looking for. A religious experience perhaps, as my whole life ever since has included this man, Morrissey.
His words were so special to a teenage boy with high hopes but low expectations.
Nothing mattered to me as much as the words and music of The Smiths. Every line was a celebration, a condemnation but with humour and intelligence that was unmatched in the pop music world, at least as far as I knew at the time.

So on the day a new record was released it was so important to me that even as a poor, working class boy who had no income whatsover and no parents to give me money, I somehow managed to raise the cash to get the bus into Manchester city centre and buy it.
And of course I read every line and verse, every credit and etched slogan that was on the sleeve and record on the journey home.
Those days are gone, but his music still retains that same importance in my life.

He has grown from a young man walking the streets of social housing in south Manchester into a man of wealth and influence.
I too have grown. (groan)
So his maturity produces a different kind of song than that made by the youth working hard to break out of the grubby estate.
My life changed too, it happens to most of us, and hopefully I have matured a bit along the way.

So the songs have changed, the music has changed, the way we first get to hear and own the recordings has changed. But for me, when I eventually sit down on my own and listen to that man sing I still feel the same as I did as a young guy listening to Hand In Glove, Ask, Strangeways, Meat Is Murder, Well I Wonder, Barbarism.. etc., the list is a long one.

With the single exception of some song about a plane crash in 1958 I have loved everything Morrissey has released as a solo artist.
And this new album is another perfect reminder of why my life changed.
Cheers Moz.

You're welcome mate, anytime.
 

Uncleskinny

It's all good
Subscriber
I agree with the general sentiments of this thread.
Having bought everything The Smiths released (and a few things they didn't) as soon as they were in the shops I also miss that excitement of waiting to visit the record shop.
The internet has a lot to answer for, but it's here and we have to deal with it.
Of course the 'net gives us so much more that it would be foolish to resent it just because it has changed the music business.

I grew up in a place called Wythenshawe in south Manchester. It was and still is a very large housing estate mostly populated by people on a low income or unemployed.
When I first heard The Smiths all those years ago it changed my life. Strange as it may seem to some people I suddenly found something that I didn't even know I was looking for. A religious experience perhaps, as my whole life ever since has included this man, Morrissey.
His words were so special to a teenage boy with high hopes but low expectations.
Nothing mattered to me as much as the words and music of The Smiths. Every line was a celebration, a condemnation but with humour and intelligence that was unmatched in the pop music world, at least as far as I knew at the time.

So on the day a new record was released it was so important to me that even as a poor, working class boy who had no income whatsover and no parents to give me money, I somehow managed to raise the cash to get the bus into Manchester city centre and buy it.
And of course I read every line and verse, every credit and etched slogan that was on the sleeve and record on the journey home.
Those days are gone, but his music still retains that same importance in my life.

He has grown from a young man walking the streets of social housing in south Manchester into a man of wealth and influence.
I too have grown. (groan)
So his maturity produces a different kind of song than that made by the youth working hard to break out of the grubby estate.
My life changed too, it happens to most of us, and hopefully I have matured a bit along the way.

So the songs have changed, the music has changed, the way we first get to hear and own the recordings has changed. But for me, when I eventually sit down on my own and listen to that man sing I still feel the same as I did as a young guy listening to Hand In Glove, Ask, Strangeways, Meat Is Murder, Well I Wonder, Barbarism.. etc., the list is a long one.

With the single exception of some song about a plane crash in 1958 I have loved everything Morrissey has released as a solo artist.
And this new album is another perfect reminder of why my life changed.
Cheers Moz.

Your story is an uncanny echo of mine, Mr. Chill. I too grew up on a large council estate, and...well, you've said the rest. Eloquence like that demands an outlet for your writing skills.

I agree with everything you say before 9:30pm.

Peter
 

leastlikelyto

first lost lad
The internet has ruined looking forward to new albums for me - well primarilly Mozz albums. I succumbed to hearing Quarry and Ringleaders in their entirety before going to the shops to buy my copy. This time I'm going to wait. There's nothing like that feeling of going into HMV or wherever and picking up a copy of a new album you've been waiting to hear for ages, going to the checkout to pay for it and then travelling home reading the sleeve feeling all tingly and excited. I know one always has a choice, but temptation and reading what everyone says on here always seems to get to people, me....

Thats why I wont download the album, I'll wait until it's in the store, cause whats the difference between a person how loves Morrissey more than life and downloads it or some jerk who just does the same, because he/she has heard First of the Gang to Die? None.

I agree with you on that totally! It's an amazing feeling to hold a new copy of an album in your hand and feel the paper and read the lyrics while listening to the tracks for the very first time. Even tough I heard some of the
 

jm26

Member
I agree with the general sentiments of this thread.
Having bought everything The Smiths released (and a few things they didn't) as soon as they were in the shops I also miss that excitement of waiting to visit the record shop.
The internet has a lot to answer for, but it's here and we have to deal with it.
Of course the 'net gives us so much more that it would be foolish to resent it just because it has changed the music business.

I grew up in a place called Wythenshawe in south Manchester. It was and still is a very large housing estate mostly populated by people on a low income or unemployed.
When I first heard The Smiths all those years ago it changed my life. Strange as it may seem to some people I suddenly found something that I didn't even know I was looking for. A religious experience perhaps, as my whole life ever since has included this man, Morrissey.
His words were so special to a teenage boy with high hopes but low expectations.
Nothing mattered to me as much as the words and music of The Smiths. Every line was a celebration, a condemnation but with humour and intelligence that was unmatched in the pop music world, at least as far as I knew at the time.

So on the day a new record was released it was so important to me that even as a poor, working class boy who had no income whatsover and no parents to give me money, I somehow managed to raise the cash to get the bus into Manchester city centre and buy it.
And of course I read every line and verse, every credit and etched slogan that was on the sleeve and record on the journey home.
Those days are gone, but his music still retains that same importance in my life.

He has grown from a young man walking the streets of social housing in south Manchester into a man of wealth and influence.
I too have grown. (groan)
So his maturity produces a different kind of song than that made by the youth working hard to break out of the grubby estate.
My life changed too, it happens to most of us, and hopefully I have matured a bit along the way.

So the songs have changed, the music has changed, the way we first get to hear and own the recordings has changed. But for me, when I eventually sit down on my own and listen to that man sing I still feel the same as I did as a young guy listening to Hand In Glove, Ask, Strangeways, Meat Is Murder, Well I Wonder, Barbarism.. etc., the list is a long one.

With the single exception of some song about a plane crash in 1958 I have loved everything Morrissey has released as a solo artist.
And this new album is another perfect reminder of why my life changed.
Cheers Moz.

Your from Manchester and you don't know about the Munich Air Disaster, and shamefully dismiss it as "some plane crash"? Have you ever left your house?

And its actually a pretty decent song, that lyrically was quite controversial, but that Moz has made a point of insisting it was meant as a tribute to those who perished.
 

vivabob

Ordinary Boy
Welcome to the forum David13. I share the same opinion of YOR - it's a belter of an album. I've been a fan since 1992 and have seen the man live 16 times I believe, so we're coming in from the same angle. What no-one has said is that the album sounds very 2009 if that makes sense? It doesn't really look back to the past in any ways which is refreshing for once.

i agree ..:o
 
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