A question to all the veteran Moz/Smiths fans

Poco Innocente

A ring a ding ding
During the 7-year period from Morrissey finishing Maladjusted to releasing YATQ...what an earth were you all thinking? I have no idea if it was 'known' that he would release more albums (YATQ etc). Or did you think that was it? The end of Morrissey's music career? Had Morrissey mentioned in that period his musical intentions?

I am curious because if you were left in the dark I'd have gone potty, knowing he was out there but there would be no more new material.

What was it like to be a Morrissey fan during this period?
 

wolve

the sad punk
Poco Innocente said:
I have no idea if it was 'known' that he would release more albums

In a way it was hope giving when he did some tours, and played new material. But there wasn't something that secured the fans (I know, this word isn't approprate) that new material would ever be recorded.



(Good topic. Looking forward to read some stories.)
 

Ambrosia

Oh my sacred one...
I remember I knew he had some new material, but was looking for a new record company. I crossed fingers and expected patiently in a corner :( and I was so happy when the Sanctuary contract and YATQ release were announced!
 

The Youngest

doesn't eat his friends
I have a question:
What will Morrissey do when Sanctury piss him off and he leaves?
 

wolve

the sad punk
^I hope that doesn't happen. Or else there's gonna be _again_ a period where he's in search of a good record compagny. And we'll be in the dark too :(
 

Ambrosia

Oh my sacred one...
The Youngest said:
I have a question:
What will Morrissey do when Sanctury piss him off and he leaves?

I've already written somewhere. I'm afraid this could happen indeed. Then...who knows...I hope he'll start an indie label, but then I know I wouldn't see easily any live show around :(.
 

[email protected] Vale Lover

Let the Right One Slip In
The Youngest said:
I have a question:
What will Morrissey do when Sanctury piss him off and he leaves?

Then He will have a major big label next time. :cool: So cool He is - That lesser can do it :) Moz is so big again that He can bare it but can the labels

Something like in the EMI/HMV years.
 

Poco Innocente

A ring a ding ding
get your own ruddy thread!! :rolleyes:
 

Sphinx

I am less than nothing
Ok back on topic

Poco Innocente said:
During the 7-year period from Morrissey finishing Maladjusted to releasing YATQ...what an earth were you all thinking?

For me it coincided with other things that were happening and a band I loved drifted somewhat too, so it signalled change for me and a serious slow down in my social life/gig going. As for what I was thinking.....I didnt because I never envisaged how long it could be :eek:

I'm not sure I like replying as a veteran........
 
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JLA75

Junior Member
Hi there,
I don't really post much (anymore) but wanted to share my 7-year-gap story. I've been a fan since around 92 but never really knew too many people who were fans aside from a coupel of friends. Around 97 when I got my first computer, I met a ton of people (friends and lovers) via the Morrissey AOL chat room (anyone remember that?). After the Maladjusted hoopla died out and things were looking bleek, I actually saw Morrissey more times than before the internet days. I met the man a couple of times during those 7 years. He showed up at a Boz gig in Eagle Rock where I shook his hand (and Boz too). He signed my Suedehead single at a radio station in San Bernadino when he was promoting My Early Burgraly Years. Also got my Oye Esteban DVD signed at the Virgin signing session in Hollywood. Then there were the tours. Went to about 10 shows in 99/00 and another 4 in 2002. Too many stories to share here (like being drunk and bumping into Gary and Spike at the Mandalay Bay. Gary was holding 4 cases of Coronas and I asked to shake his hand. He gave me a look like "look you drunk fool, my hands are full") . There were also the weekly rumors on this site that he was about to sign a deal.
Now I'm 30 with a mortgage and about to get married!? With too many responsibilities now I can longer drop everything to follow Moz and the boys around the country (I did go to another 10 shows during the YATQ tour though). But I'll always fondly remember those 7 years for all the Moz related experiences and people I met.

Joey
 

Fantsu

A Crashing Bore
I was very patient and just waited for the new one in the future. I never thought that it was over... In the mean time I listened to his earlier albums and The Smiths' albums lots, so he was really never 'away' :)
 

DeliciousDemon

Ghost of the troubled Joe
What was it like to be a fan at that time?

Well, I somehow knew that he'll eventually emerge with a new record deal and a new album so I kept myself going by listening to old Smiths/Moz tracks and discovering new bands. I figured he's not the kind of person who'd leave with things left unsaid. I also knew he wouldn't leave the glorious world of entertainment without throwing his first gig in my country.

Which he thankfully did this year. God bless.
 
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Ambrosia

Oh my sacred one...
I used to mention his case to prove how a v. admirably consistent artist may suffer in this stupid and deaf show business. I'm proud of him: there aren't so many artist who can slam the door ;).
 

Worm

Taste the diffidence
Those years weren't difficult at all. I know that sounds strange, but the years of silence weren't so tough to take because "Maladjusted" was my least favorite album of his (and remains so). Everything seemed so tired and ill-conceived-- from the songs to the sleeves to the tours-- that I thought he should take time to find his way again. Also, as has been said above, he toured a few times in that time span, giving us the opportunity to see him in small venues. He was obviously alive and well and writing songs, so there wasn't much fear that we'd never hear him again.

Also, since you wanted "personal" responses, I'll add that my need for Morrissey, as a fan, was rather different than it had been for many years. Back in 1988, when I'd go crazy for a few months waiting for the new single, life was bitter and fruitless without new Morrissey material. By 1997 and "Maladjusted", however, I was-- excuse me-- better adjusted. Waiting wasn't so hard. When "Quarry" came out it was the right time. The music was strong, he was given a legend's welcome by the press, and he himself had changed enough to make the comeback artistically worthwhile.

Last but not least, Morrissey-solo, which I discovered in 1998, kept me plugged in to the Morrissey community, if only as an observer. David has done such a wonderful job with this site. If this hadn't existed, those wilderness years would have been much, much worse. Others have said, and I agree, that Morrissey owes David a debt of gratitude for helping to keep many Morrissey fans from wandering away forever. What might have been seven years of total blackout didn't feel that way at all. If Morrissey is now discovering text messaging, he might also be figuring out the importance of the Internet. Smiths/Morrissey sites were crucial in those years, and none was better than David's.
 

hatfull

HIM-full
I have to say, I agree with all that has been said. The years were tough, particularly as none of my friends liked him and I didn't have the internet, but I also felt he needed time to rediscover the thing he had been so passionate about, find a deal, and write some great songs. And Quarry didn't disappoint. From the very first note it drew me in, put a smile on my face, and left me desperate for more!!!! I think that is one of the main reasons I have so much love for Quarry.
 
I have been a fan since about 1995 (the first album I bought was Vauxhall and I). Though I can't say the break really affected me because in the beginning I almost exclusively listened to the Smiths records. For some reason I had become convinced that Morrissey's solo work wasn't half as interesting as that of the Smiths (despite the beauty of Vauxhall). So I didn't buy the remaining solo albums until shortly before Quarry was released and it wasn't until then that I became a massive fan of solo Morrissey.

I can't say I ever was worried he wouldn't return since he always said he had new songs and was just looking for a new record deal. It would be quite devastating if this kind of long break happened again, though.
 

Slip-In

Junior Member
I never for a second had a doubt he would retire or that he wouldn't get a new recording deal, it has been said there were Music Labels interested in signing him but ultimately "They" didn't feel OK for Moz to sign with.

I remember when I first heard the new tracks live that went on to appear on YATQ, they sounded fantastic live but waiting 7 years for new material was really awful, nonetheless it was a triumph comeback and a well deserved one at that, :) :) :)

As they say, once you've admired and followed an artist for so many years, it very hard to think of them as gone even when they stop recording for seven years. I was just so glad to have so many Smiths and Morrissey songs to keep playing but verye excited about new ones to be released too, ;)
 

Poco Innocente

A ring a ding ding
Worm said:
Those years weren't difficult at all. I know that sounds strange, but the years of silence weren't so tough to take because "Maladjusted" was my least favorite album of his (and remains so). Everything seemed so tired and ill-conceived-- from the songs to the sleeves to the tours-- that I thought he should take time to find his way again. Also, as has been said above, he toured a few times in that time span, giving us the opportunity to see him in small venues. He was obviously alive and well and writing songs, so there wasn't much fear that we'd never hear him again.

Also, since you wanted "personal" responses, I'll add that my need for Morrissey, as a fan, was rather different than it had been for many years. Back in 1988, when I'd go crazy for a few months waiting for the new single, life was bitter and fruitless without new Morrissey material. By 1997 and "Maladjusted", however, I was-- excuse me-- better adjusted. Waiting wasn't so hard. When "Quarry" came out it was the right time. The music was strong, he was given a legend's welcome by the press, and he himself had changed enough to make the comeback artistically worthwhile.

Last but not least, Morrissey-solo, which I discovered in 1998, kept me plugged in to the Morrissey community, if only as an observer. David has done such a wonderful job with this site. If this hadn't existed, those wilderness years would have been much, much worse. Others have said, and I agree, that Morrissey owes David a debt of gratitude for helping to keep many Morrissey fans from wandering away forever. What might have been seven years of total blackout didn't feel that way at all. If Morrissey is now discovering text messaging, he might also be figuring out the importance of the Internet. Smiths/Morrissey sites were crucial in those years, and none was better than David's.

interesting stuff :)
 

Mmmmmm

Dangling Member
I hadn't thought about it but now that you mention it, it was the start of the end of the love affair that began in '84. This is how it played out:

Maladjusted was a bit weak, though the stronger tracks didn't make that too obvious at the time.

The legal battle with Joyce and Rourke had brought to the fore his irascible spirit in a less than charming way (q.v. "Sorrow..."). This would continue.

Disputes with labels sullied the 'art' with 'avarice' (on both sides)

The move to California made him a more public figure but without any product for support. It also changed his disposition - made him almost bipolar. Many interviews were absolutely bitter but he was often sunnier and downright happy.

He was becoming a diva.

All of this would have been fine (after all we xcan't expect him not to change) except for the fact that the music was getting stuck in a rut. Lyriclly it wasn't as sharp and it still ploughed the same ground.

By the time Quarry came out (in drips and drabs) the lustre was gone. It was a solid album. I love it and listen to it a great deal but the reverence of the creative force behind eroded away over those seven years.

And Ringleader! The first Smiths or solo album I did not buy since '84 (barring a couple of those best of's). When something from Hatful or Kill Uncle pops up on the iPod next to a Ringleader track it is painful how unimaginative the work has become.
 
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