Brain Food

By realitybites · Aug 14, 2012 · ·
Categories:
  1. Videos:

    View attachment 14000 Charlie Rose Brain Series

    Recommended episodes:

    Consciousness

    Depression

    Alzheimers Disease

    Neurological, Psychiatric and Addictive Disorders

    The Great Mysteries of the Human Brain



    Podcasts:


    View attachment 14001 Brain Science Podcast

    Recommended episodes:

    Dave Eagleman on the Secret Lives of the Brain

    How Mind Emerges From Brain

    Consciouness With Christof Koch



    View attachment 14005 Skepticality

    Recommended Episodes:

    The Believing Brain




    Books:

    [​IMG] ~ Incomplete Nature

    A radical new explanation of how life and consciousness emerge from physics and chemistry. As physicists work toward completing a theory of the universe and biologists unravel the molecular complexity of life, a glaring incompleteness in this scientific vision becomes apparent. The "Theory of Everything" that appears to be emerging includes everything but us: the feelings, meanings, consciousness, and purposes that make us (and many of our animal cousins) what we are. These most immediate and incontrovertible phenomena are left unexplained by the natural sciences because they lack the physical properties—such as mass, momentum, charge, and location—that are assumed to be necessary for something to have physical consequences in the world. This is an unacceptable omission. We need a "theory of everything" that does not leave it absurd that we exist.



    [​IMG] ~ Free Will

    A BELIEF IN FREE WILL touches nearly everything that human beings value. It is difficult to think about law, politics, religion, public policy, intimate relationships, morality—as well as feelings of remorse or personal achievement—without first imagining that every person is the true source of his or her thoughts and actions. And yet the facts tell us that free will is an illusion.

    In this enlightening book, Sam Harris argues that this truth about the human mind does not undermine morality or diminish the importance of social and political freedom, but it can and should change the way we think about some of the most important questions in life.



    [​IMG] ~ Who's In Charge?

    The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions

    A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the brain has taken hold in recent years: Since physical laws govern the physical world and our own brains are part of that world, physical laws therefore govern our behavior and even our conscious selves. Free will is meaningless, goes the mantra; we live in a “determined” world.

    Not so, argues the renowned neuroscientist Michael S. Gazzaniga in this thoughtful, provocative book based on his Gifford Lectures——one of the foremost lecture series in the world dealing with religion, science, and philosophy. Who’s in Charge? proposes that the mind, which is somehow generated by the physical processes of the brain, “constrains” the brain just as cars are constrained by the traffic they create. Writing with what Steven Pinker has called “his trademark wit and lack of pretension,” Gazzaniga shows how determinism immeasurably weakens our views of human responsibility; it allows a murderer to argue, in effect, “It wasn’t me who did it——it was my brain.” Gazzaniga convincingly argues that even given the latest insights into the physical mechanisms of the mind, there is an undeniable human reality: We are responsible agents who should be held accountable for our actions, because responsibility is found in how people interact, not in brains.

    An extraordinary book that ranges across neuroscience, psychology, ethics, and the law with a light touch but profound implications, Who’s in Charge? is a lasting contribution from one of the leading thinkers of our time.



    [​IMG] ~ Incognito

    If the conscious mind--the part you consider to be you--is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing?

    In this sparkling and provocative book, renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate its surprising mysteries. Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Is there a true Mel Gibson? How is your brain like a conflicted democracy engaged in civil war? What do Odysseus and the subprime mortgage meltdown have in common? Why are people whose names begin with J more like to marry other people whose names begin with J? And why is it so difficult to keep a secret?

    Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence, and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

Comments

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  1. realitybites
    You're welcome. Thanks for visiting my blog.
  2. 123xyz
    Had a quick look at the Charlie Rose episode on depression. Thanks for posting all these links ; it's nice to have a wander through some of them.

    Was interested to see Andrew Solomon turn up on that episode. Read his book on depressive disorders ( The Noonday Demon) about ten years ago .... have never been able to make up my mind about it. The brief comments he makes on Focault's Madness & ...
    in that same book have always struck me as shockingly stupid ( and I say that as anything other than a Foucault/Derrida devotee )...

    Thanks again...

    123xyz