The Smiths

The Smiths

Not sure if these were reported already...

The Smiths were way more subsversive than we (and David Cameron) care to remember - Pitchfork (The Pitch)
The Smiths’ The Queen Is Dead Annotated for 30th Anniversary: Watch - Pitchfork (Liner Notes documentary)



Links from an anonymous person:

The Incredible Full Story Behind The Smiths' 'The Queen Is Dead' As Told By The Band - NME
You might be able to recite every lyric off by heart, but how well do you really know ‘The Queen is Dead’? Did you know, for example, that the Stones, The Stooges and spliffs all helped shape its sound? Or that...
Exhibition of photos by Nalinee Darmrong from her book The Smiths: 1985-86 at Studio 1469 in Washington D.C.

Artist Talk + Book Signing: Saturday, June 18th, 6 – 9 PM. Remarks at 7 PM.



Exhibition: June 17 through August 2016
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Am not sure if this has been mentioned elsewhere. I did a search and couldn't find it. In Tom Hingley's autobiography "Carpet Burns: Life with the Inspiral Carpets" (Amazon link) he mentions using a rehearsal space "Out of the Blue" in Blossom Street, Ancoats. He mentions that the word was that The Smiths had also used the rehearsal space. Nearby in Sherratt Street there was an old pub named The Smith's Arms. The place was apparently decorated with pages from the "Daily Record" newspaper recording moments from WW2 including D-Day and VE Day. One headline there, says Tom, was 'Louder Than Bombs'. Now I understand that "Louder than Bombs" comes from Elizabeth Smart. Am just reporting what Tom wrote.
I Know It's Overrated: The Queen Is Dead Turns Thirty - The Quietus
Simon Price , June 13th, 2016 06:10

In the three decades since its release, The Smiths' The Queen Is Dead has repeatedly been hailed as the band's crowning achievement, and regularly features in lists of the greatest albums ever made. Lifelong Smiths fan Simon Price, however, is not so sure
Pretty funny writeup from Consequence of Sound:

The Smiths’ The Queen Is Dead Turns 30
A track-by-track breakdown of the celebrated album's most "Morrissey" lyrics
By Bryn Rich

Excerpt:

Thirty-seven minutes.

That’s how long it takes The Queen Is Dead to cover sleazy record company executives, unrequited love, regicide, suicide, organized religion, women’s bodies, dead poets, and pretty much every other theme you could possibly imagine. In one swoop, The Smiths perfectly summed up the personal and political challenges of life in the UK during Margaret Thatcher’s 1980s.
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Link posted by FROSTY (original post):

You’ve Got to See This Local Photographer’s Book About Her Teenage Years Touring With the Smiths - Washingtonian
By Greta Weber on June 8, 2016
Nalinee Darmrong captured the band at its commercial peak.
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Irregular Regular posted (original post):

Nice little interview with the author here:

The Day Morrissey Smiled: On Tour with The Smiths 1985–86 - Cuepoint / Medium
by Mike “DJ” Pizzo
Photographer Nalinee Darmrong captured intimate moments from the band’s fabled stint in the spotlight



Related item:
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If you are a fan of The Smiths, this amazing photo book from the personal collection of family friend Nalinee Darmrong is worth a purchase... for yourself or friends who are Smiths fans. All photos were taken by herself over a few of years traveling with the band. The book is published by Rizzoli and is on sale at Amazon right now. Forwards by Nalinee, Andy Bell of Ride, and Marc Spitz music journalist of Rolling Stone and others.

The photos are really great. Comparable to professional magazine photos.

The Smiths (Hardcover) - Amazon.com
by Nalinee Darmrong
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Rizzoli (June 14, 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0847848124
  • ISBN-13: 978-0847848126
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 1 x 12 inches


Link posted by FROSTY:

The Smiths by Nalinee Darmrong - END




Posted by kissmyshadestoo:

I found this on a Tumblr post here (soivechangedmypleatoguilty), there was an article in Esquire about the book...